Revenue of the United States: Official Report [for 1869]

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Macmillan, 1870 - Revenue - 143 pages
 

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Page 102 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 11 - ... the national requirement for the payment of interest and extinguishment of the debt. It has been estimated by one who has made this subject a study, that the products of agriculture, manufactures, mining, mechanic arts, commerce, fisheries, and forests, in the year 1850 were at 28 9 per cent, of the value of the real and personal property of the United States.
Page 110 - ... country. In 1855 he published a valuable Memoir on Meteorites. Since that time he has given special attention to these bodies. His private collection of meteorites was one of the largest in the world, and he was regarded as one of the highest authorities on this subject. Professor Smith was one of the commissioners of the United States to the Paris Exposition of 1867, and to the Vienna Exposition in 1873. His report on " The Progress and Condition of Several Departments of Industrial Chemistry...
Page 89 - average expenditure requisite to produce a ton of pig iron in the United States.
Page 76 - ... maximum."2 Wells also repeated his recommendation that the exemptions for rentals be limited to two hundred dollars. " No claim can be made for the exemption of rent to any extent, which would not be equally valid in support of the exemption of any other expenditure ; and certainly high rents are as much a luxury as any form of expenditure, and as little deserving of economical sympathy.
Page 34 - ... pursuits directly productive of national wealth, and sought employments connected with commerce, trading, or speculation. As a consequence we everywhere find large additions to the population of our commercial cities, an increase in the number and cost of buildings devoted to banking, brokerage, insurance, commission business, and agencies of all...
Page 4 - We shall have $4,171,914,498.33 which sum represents the cost of the war to the United States government down to June 30, 1869. To this sum should be added the value of the pensions now paid by the Government on account of the war, if the same were capitalized. This, at eight years' purchase of the present annual payment, would amount to about two hundred millions. But this aggregate, however large, must still further be increased by other items if we would reach the true cost of the war to us as...
Page 7 - ... both races were alleviated by government rations and by private beneficence ; but planters were compelled to supply all the wants of themselves and their laborers, while breadstuff's were at very high prices, and implements, farming animals, and their subsistence were equally scarce and dear. At first the freedmen were not disposed to work for hire — demanded excessive wages, and after accepting them, too often rendered poor service. The crops of both cotton and grain failed, more or less,...
Page 44 - ... transfer' of the surplus product of society, and the creation of facilities for it, available to the cunning and quick as against the dull and slow, has come to pervade the whole fabric of that which we call government, and how large a number of the most progressive minds of the nation have been led to accept as a fundamental truth in political doctrine, that the best way to take care of the many is to commence...
Page 55 - ... it as to make it better for him to pay from forty to fortyfive cents for American salt; or, in other words, to take less than half the quantity for the same money, — the Government at the same time receiving but little revenue, the ostensible object for which a tax on salt, through the medium of a tariff, was in the first instance imposed. "Or perhaps he lives in Maine, and wants coal, and could get twenty tons from Nova Scotia for his hundred dollars. But the Government having imposed a tax...

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