Revision of the Gulls of North America: Based Upon Specimens in the Museum of the Smithsonian Institution

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publisher not identified, 1862 - Gulls - 22 pages
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Page 311 - The neck above and the whole under plumage deeply tinged with peach-blossom red in recent specimens. Bill black; its rictus and the edges of the eyelids reddish-orange. Legs and feet vermilion-red; nails blackish. "Form. — Bill slender, weak, with a scarcely perceptible salient angle beneath; the upper mandible slightly arched and compressed towards the point; the commissure slightly curved at the tip. Wings an inch longer than the decidedly...
Page 294 - Bill flesh-colored at base, blackish on terminal third. Entire plumage pure white, the shafts of the feathers straw yellow. Feet light flesh-color. Yonng: Head, neck and upper parts mottled with light reddish brown, appearing on the latter as irregular patches, and on the rump as more or less obsolete transverse bars. Under parts a nearly uniform very light reddish brown, the under tail coverts transversely barred with white. Wings and tail pure...
Page 298 - ... BorealiAmericana. As Richardson does not particularly mention the character of the bluish markings on the bases of the primaries, and gives the legs as flesh colored, there was no difficulty in referring the European specimens to the description. On account of the difference of size of the...
Page 311 - Scapulars, inter-scapulars, and both surfaces of the wings clear pearl-grey; outer web of the first quill blackish-brown to its tip, which is grey; tips of the scapulars and lesser quills whitish. Some small feathers near the eye, and a collar round the middle of the neck pitch black; rest of the plumage white.
Page 291 - Conrad. Miocene of the Pacific Coast. "Inequivalve, radiately costate; hinge with a triangular pit as in Pecten and diverging prominent teeth on each side the ligament cavity." Conrad, 1862. The valves are generally large and coarse, both of them convex, the left valve slightly more inflated than the right. The costals, unlike those of Chlamys, ss, are relatively few in number but very heavy and not dichotomous. Lyropecten is the dominant group in the middle Miocene, conspicuous...
Page 311 - Bxird thinks that there is no good reason to consider this bird an inhabitant of or even a visitor to North America. It has been included in our fauna on the strength of a statement of Sabine, who saw a small Gull, with black head and bill, greatly resembling the Larut minului.
Page 291 - Jefftrsoniua in being comparatively more elevated or ovate ; in having smaller ears, and more numerous and narrower ribs, &c. P. Edgecomens is. — Suborbicnlar ; height not quite equal to the length ; lower valve-ribs 16 to 17, prominent, but not elevated, square or convexdepressed, not quite as wide as the intervening spaces, radiately lined with finely squamose striae, most conspicuous towards the margins, interstices of ribs eariuated, in the middle squamose and finely striated ; ears with fine...
Page 309 - Brucb, 1855; Lawr. 1858. Sp. char. — Bill very short, scarcely more than two-thirds the head, about three-fourths the tarsus, moderately stout, the culmen regularly curved from base to tip ; angle well defined and very prominent. Adult: hood deep plumbeous black, barely encircling the head, not extending further on the throat than on the nape. Lower eyelid white, upper more broadly so, the white extending behind the eye. Mantle bluish plumbeous, as in Franklinii, with more blue than in atricilla.
Page 294 - Bruch, who adopts that name, speaks of the " gull-blue" of the upper parts. In the Fauna Boreali-Americana, ii. p. 419, there is given a brief description of a Gull, which is certainly, I think, the present species. The names "arcticus" and "glacialis" being in my opinion untenable, I adopt that of Hutchinsii, proposed by Richardson. I have no doubt of the validity of the species. This species is now introduced into the Fauna of the United States through a specimen killed in Washington co., New York,...
Page 292 - It is also illustrated by figures of the billa of all the species, and colored drawings of the primary quills, showing the outlines and extent of their markings. The gulls of North America are worked up to the fullest extent that the specimens at my command allow ; but, in the apparent hopelessness of arriving at ultimate truth with regard to these birds, I am prepared to relinquish any of the views now entertained which future investigation may prove to be erroneous. Family LARIDsE.

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