Revitalizations and Mazeways

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U of Nebraska Press, 2003 - Social Science - 339 pages
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Anthony F. C. Wallace, one of the most influential American anthropologists of the modern era, brings together some of his most stimulating and celebrated writings. These essays feature his seminal work on revitalization movements, which has profoundly shaped our understanding of the processes of change in religious and political organizations—from the nineteenth-century code of the Seneca prophet known as Handsome Lake to the origins of world religions and political faiths. Wallace also discusses mazeways—mental maps that join personalities with cultures and thereby illustrate how individuals embrace their culture, conduct everyday life, and cope with illness and other forms of severe personal or cultural stress. Wallace offers a set of penetrating observations and analyses of change on topics ranging from immediate responses to disasters to long-term technological adaptations and transformations in artistic style. Wallace’s theories, fieldwork, and concepts featured in this landmark volume continue to challenge scholars across disciplines, including anthropologists, historians, sociologists, and theologians.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
New Religions among the Delaware Indians 16001900
38
Handsome Lake and the Decline of the Iroquois Matriarchate
57
Paradigmatic Processes in Culture Change
68
The Meaning of Cultural Fit
85
Paradigms and Revolutions in the Arts
120
Introduction
143
Inspiration
164
A Type of Psychoanalytic
189
The Psychic Unity of Human Groups
207
Mental Illness Biology and Culture
225
The Trip
262
The Identity Struggle
269
References Cited
311
Source Acknowledgments
325
Copyright

The Individuals Perception
178

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About the author (2003)

Anthony F. C. Wallace is a professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of many books, including The Social Context of Innovation: Bureaucrats, Families, and Heroes in the Early Industrial Revolution, as Foreseen in Bacon’s “New Atlantis” (Nebraska 2003).
Robert S. Grumet is an archaeologist for the National Park Service, Mid-Atlantic Region. He is the editor of Northeastern Indian Lives: 1632–1816 and the author of Historic Contact: Indian People and Colonists in Today’s Northeastern United States in the Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries.

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