Revolution, Issue 9

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Fiction - 100 pages
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Take this, brother, may it sere you well....

As he lies, bound and hidden, on the floor of his abductors' SUV, Carroll Monks is only dimly aware of the bizarre series of high-profile murders sweeping across the nation. What he thinks about instead, a they travel for hours deep into the Northern California wilderness, is that the face of one of his abductors belongs to his own son, Glenn--long estranged and living (the last Monks knew) on the streets of Seattle.

The vehicle finally stops. when Monks is untied and stpes out, he sees he's been brought to a remote off-the-grid community where paramilitary training and methamphetamine makes for combustible, uneasy bedfellows--and that Glen has fallen under the spell of a disenfranchised counter-cultural sociopath known simply as Freeboot, who claims that a revolution "of the people" is already under way. Monks is appalled by Freeboot's violent histrionics and Manson-like affinity for the hidden messages buried within Lennon and McCartney lyrics, yet acknowledges that he hears echoes of his won feelings when Freeboot speaks about the disintegration of workers' rights, the escalating differential between the haves and the have-nots, and the slap-on-the-wrist "justice" doled out in cases of billion-dollar corporate malfeasance. Could this well-armed madman actually have his finger on teh pulse of the underclass?

The reason Monks has been abducted, he soon discovers, is Freeboot's own son, a four-year-old boy who is deathly ill--a conundrum for Freeboot, who's distrust of institutional America (hospitals included) borders on the psychotic. Monks, and ER physician, has been brought in to care for the boy, but he can see immediately that the boy's condition is acute and that only immediate hospitalization will save him. When Monk's pleas fall on deaf ears, he fashions a daring escape during a snowstorm, with the young boy slung across his back--and brings the wrath of a madman down on himself and his family, culminating in a diabolically crafted "revolution"--a re-creation of Hitchcock's The Birds, but with human predators, unleashed on the town of Bodega Bay, California.

 

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Revolution no. 9: a novel of suspense

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In McMahon's fourth Carroll Monks thriller (after To the Bone ), the ER doctor is kidnapped late one night by a group of backwoods fanatics, led by a barefooted Manson-like sociopath who calls himself ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
15
Section 3
23
Section 4
36
Section 5
50
Section 6
62
Section 7
76
Section 8
82
Section 24
190
Section 25
203
Section 26
214
Section 27
224
Section 28
228
Section 29
235
Section 30
241
Section 31
247

Section 9
92
Section 10
103
Section 11
113
Section 12
118
Section 13
123
Section 14
127
Section 15
131
Section 16
140
Section 17
148
Section 18
152
Section 19
157
Section 20
162
Section 21
166
Section 22
175
Section 23
185
Section 32
254
Section 33
259
Section 34
262
Section 35
266
Section 36
271
Section 37
281
Section 38
285
Section 39
290
Section 40
294
Section 41
305
Section 42
311
Section 43
323
Section 44
328
Section 45
333
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Neil McMahon holds a degree in psychology from Stanford and was a Stegner fellow. He has published ten novels, in addition to the bestselling thriller Toys, coauthored with James Patterson. He lives in Missoula, Montana, where his wife directs the annual Montana Festival of the Book.

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