Richard Wilde

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Random House, Feb 15, 2013 - Fiction - 528 pages
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Can love survive the worst betrayal of all?

From the moment Elizabeth Nugent arrives to live on his family's farm in Shropshire, Richard Wilde is in love with her. And as they grow up, it seems like nothing can keep them apart.

But as the Second World War rages, Richard is sent to fight in the jungles of Burma, leaving Elizabeth to deal with a terrible secret that could destroy his family.

Despite the distance between them, though, Richard and Elizabeth's love remains constant through war, tragedy and betrayal.

But once the fighting is over, will the secrets and lies that Elizabeth has been hiding keep them apart for ever?

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
8
Section 3
20
Section 4
32
Section 5
49
Section 6
62
Section 7
78
Section 8
92
Section 18
259
Section 19
279
Section 20
298
Section 21
317
Section 22
335
Section 23
355
Section 24
376
Section 25
395

Section 9
107
Section 10
124
Section 11
142
Section 12
158
Section 13
173
Section 14
192
Section 15
209
Section 16
226
Section 17
241
Section 26
415
Section 27
435
Section 28
454
Section 29
473
Section 30
491
Section 31
516
Section 32
522
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Mary Fitzgerald was born and brought up in Chester. At eighteen she left home to start nursing training. She ended up as an operating theatre sister in a large London hospital and there met her husband. Ten years and four children later the family settled for a while in Canada and later the USA. For several years they lived in West Wales, northern Scotland and finally southern Ireland until they settled again near Chester. Mary had long given up nursing and gone into business, first a children's clothes shop, then a book shop and finally an internet clothes enterprise.

Mary now lives in a small village in north Shropshire close to the Montgomery canal and with a view of both the Welsh and the Shropshire hills.

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