Ricoeur, Identity and Early Childhood

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Oct 16, 2010 - Education - 184 pages
Early childhood education in Western society has come under increasing scrutiny by governments that see early education as an important factor in economic growth and development. Thus, social traditions in the field are increasingly giving way to an intensified focus on marketization and regulation, but with a corresponding diminishing concern for ethics and social participation. Drawing on the work of contemporary French philosopher Paul Ricoeur, Sandy Farquhar analyzes the problematic way in which we become who we are and the discourse that surrounds that learning. The book explores the ethical basis of identity formation in early childhood education and seeks fresh alternatives to commonly accepted perspectives on social policy, education, and the nature of our 'selves.' Farquhar uses Aotearoa New Zealand bicultural curriculum and policy context as examples for developing the theme of curriculum as a contest of ideas and a powerful form of resistance. Promoting the importance of narrative in understanding identity formation, the book elaborates on contemporary themes of difference, ethics, and social justice, calling for a revitalized sense of liberalism and social democracy.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Narrative Identity
3
Chapter 2 Identity Narrative and Early Education
9
Chapter 3 Situating Ricoeurs Narrative Theory
23
Chapter 4 Ricoeurs Hermeneutic
39
Chapter 5 Narrative Identity Ethics and Education
53
PART II IDENTITY AND SUBJECTIVITY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
71
Chapter 6 Social Institutions of Childhood
73
Chapter 7 A Liberal Tradition
93
Chapter 8 An Individual Entrepreneur
117
Chapter 9 An Other Narrative
143
Notes
153
References
155
Index
163
About the Author
171
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About the author (2010)

Sandy Farquhar is senior lecturer of teaching, learning and development at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

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