Rinkitink in Oz

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1st World Publishing, May 22, 2006 - Literary Collections - 216 pages
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Here is a story with a boy hero, and a boy of whom you have never before heard. There are girls in the story, too, including our old friend Dorothy, and some of the characters wander a good way from the Land of Oz before they all assemble in the Emerald City to take part in Ozma's banquet. Indeed, I think you will find this story quite different from the other histories of Oz, but I hope you will not like it the less on that account.
 

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User Review  - SoulFlower1981 - LibraryThing

Baum has definitely refound his footing as an author when it comes to the Oz books. He has found a formula that allows him to tell other stories, but still have them take place in the world of Oz ... Read full review

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Contents

1 THE PRINCE OF PINGAREE
9
2 THE COMING OF KING RINKITINK
17
3 THE WARRIORS FROM THE NORTH
27
4 THE DESERTED ISLAND
34
5 THE THREE PEARLS
44
6 THE MAGIC BOAT
60
7 THE TWIN ISLANDS
73
8 RINKITINK MAKES A GREAT MISTAKE
84
14 THE ESCAPE
128
15 THE FLIGHT OF THE RULERS
140
16 NIKOBOB REFUSES A CROWN
144
17 THE NOME KING
150
18 INGA PARTS WITH HIS PINK PEARL
158
19 RINKITINK CHUCKLES
176
20 DOROTHY TO THE RESCUE
183
21 THE WIZARD FINDS AN ENCHANTMENT
187

9 A PRESENT FOR ZELLA
95
10 THE CUNNING OF QUEEN COR
102
11 ZELLA GOES TO COREGOS
112
12 THE EXCITEMENT OF BILBIL THE GOAT
116
13 ZELLA SAVES THE PRINCE
119
22 OZMAS BANQUET
194
23 THE PEARL KINGDOM
200
24 THE CAPTIVE KING
204
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About the author (2006)

Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored. Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.

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