Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy

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Macmillan, Mar 31, 2009 - Business & Economics - 339 pages
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"Klare's superb book explains, in haunting detail, the trends that will lead us into a series of dangerous traps unless we muster the will to transform the way we use energy."—Bill McKibben

Oil recently hit $140 a barrel, and it is still climbing. Unlike the oil shocks of the 1970s, this dizzying leap is not the product of an OPEC embargo or a sudden flare-up in the Middle East. Rather, it is a harbinger of a permanent new structure of world power, one in which market forces and military strength matter far less than the scarcity of vital natural resources.

Now in paperback, Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet surveys the energy-driven dynamic that is reconfiguring the international landscape: Russia, the battered Cold War loser, is now the arrogant broker of Eurasian energy, and the United States, once the world's superpower, must now compete with the emerging "Chindia" juggernaut for finite and diminishing resources. Forecasting a future of surprising new alliances and explosive danger, Michael T. Klare, the preeminent expert on resource geopolitics, argues that the only route to survival in our radically altered world lies through international cooperation.

 

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Contents

THE UNOCAL AFFAIR
1
ALTERED STATES
9
SEEKING MORE FINDING LESS
32
THE CHINDIA CHALLENGE
63
AN ENERGY JUGGERNAUT
88
DRAINING THE CASPIAN
115
THE GLOBAL ASSAULT ON AFRICAS VITAL RESOURCES
146
ENCROACHING ON AN AMERICAN LAKE
177
CROSSING A THRESHOLD
210
AVERTING CATASTROPHE
238
THE STRUGGLE INTENSIFIES
263
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About the author (2009)

Michael T. Klare is the author of fourteen books, including Resource Wars, Blood and Oil, Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet and The Race for What's Left. A regular contributor to Harper's, Foreign Affairs, and the Los Angeles Times, he is the defense analyst for The Nation and the director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College in Amherst.