Robert F. Kennedy and the Shaping of Civil Rights, 19601964

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McFarland, Nov 6, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 251 pages
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From the 1960 John F. Kennedy presidential campaign to the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and the Department of Justice worked tirelessly to change the climate of civil rights in the nation. This book explores how the Kennedy brothers and leaders such as Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis and James Meredith, among others, pushed for change at a critical time. Through an analysis of White House memoranda, speeches, telephone conversations and recorded discussions as well as secondary sources, this study explores Robert Kennedy's role in key events of the civil rights movement, which include the Freedom Rides in 1961, the Ole Miss crisis in 1962 and the Birmingham campaign and March on Washington in 1963. The combined efforts of the Kennedys and these leaders helped change the atmosphere in the nation to one of acceptance and opportunity for African Americans and other minorities.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
1950s A New Generation of Americans
9
1960Finding a Voice The Campaign
25
1961Action Freedom Rides and the Vote
51
1962Confl ict Ole Miss
115
1963Beginnings Alabama the Civil Rights Act and the March
169
Chapter Notes
225
Bibliography
235
Index
237
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About the author (2012)

Philip A. Goduti, Jr., is an adjunct instructor of history at Quinnipiac University. He also teaches U.S. history at Somers High School in Somers, Connecticut and has worked as a freelance reporter for the Hamden Chronicle and the Providence Journal Bulletin. He lives in Cromwell, Connecticut.

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