Robert Greene's Selimus

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H. Fiencke, 1899 - 74 pages
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Page 42 - ... quiet mind is richer than a crown ; Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent ; The poor estate scorns fortune's angry frown : Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss. The homely house that harbours quiet rest ; The cottage that affords no pride nor care ; The mean that 'grees with country music best ; The sweet consort of mirth and music's fare ; Obscured life sets down a type of bliss : A mind content both crown and kingdom is.
Page 60 - Nature, that fram'd us of four elements Warring within our breasts for regiment, Doth teach us all to have aspiring minds : Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest...
Page 41 - Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content; The quiet mind is richer than a crown; Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent; The poor estate scorns fortune's angry frown ; Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss. The homely house that harbours quiet rest, The cottage that affords no pride nor care, The mean that 'grees with country music best, The sweet consort of mirth and...
Page 52 - ... a slaughterman, till the mightiest, outliving all, one stroke were left for death, that in one age man's life should end.
Page 60 - O highest lamp of ever-living Jove, Accursed day, infected with my griefs, Hide now thy stained face in endless night, And shut the windows of the lightsome heavens ! Let ugly Darkness with her rusty coach, Engirt with tempests, wrapt in pitchy clouds, Smother the earth with never-fading mists, And let her horses from their nostrils breathe Rebellious winds and dreadful thunder-claps...
Page 54 - I scoffingly made them this answer. Tush, what better is he that dies in his bed than he that endes his life at Tyburne, all owe God a death : if I may haue my desire while I liue, I am satisfied, let me shift after death as I may.
Page 52 - This murderer of many brethren, had his conscience seared like Caine : this betrayer of him that gaue his life for him, inherited the portion of ludas : this Apostata perished as ill as lulian : and wilt thou my friend be his disciple ? Looke but to me, by him perswaded to that libertie, and thou shalt find it an infernall bondage.
Page 61 - Your fearful minds are thick and misty, then, For there sits death ; there sits imperious Death, Keeping his circuit by the slicing edge.
Page 62 - Omne tulit punctum, although latelye two Gentlemen Poets made two mad men of Rome beate it out of their paper bucklers : and had it in derision, for that I could not make my verses iet vpon the stage in tragicall buskins, euerie worde filling the mouth like the faburden of Bo-Bell, daring God out of heauen with that Atheist Tamburlan...
Page 42 - AH, what is love? It is a pretty thing, As sweet unto a shepherd as a king; And sweeter too, For kings have cares that wait upon a crown, And cares can make the sweetest love to frown : Ah then, ah then, If country loves such sweet desires do gain, What lady would not love a shepherd swain?

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