Robespierre

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Colin Haydon, William Doyle
Cambridge University Press, Apr 20, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 304 pages
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Two centuries after the French Revolution, Maximilien Robespierre is still regarded as its towering figure. Perceived by some as the champion, indeed the incarnation, of the Revolution's purest and noblest ideals, among others he will always be remembered as the reasoned advocate of the Terror, the defender of mass killing during the Revolution's darkest and most tragic phase. This volume comprises essays by an array of international scholars and examines Robespierre's life and work from three main perspectives: his ideology and vision of the Revolution, his role in the period's tumultous politics, culminating in his year on the Committee of Public Safety in 1793-94, and nineteenth- and twentieth-century representations of the Incorruptible - by historians, dramatists and writers of fiction. This book illuminates many facets of Robespierre's career, thought and reputation, and provides a balanced and up-to-date appraisal of one of the great figures of European history.
 

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Contents

Robespierres outlook
35
Robespierres politics
109
Robespierre in retrospect
175
Conclusion
253
Index
284
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

William Doyle is a writer and documentary producer whose previous book, Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton, was a New York Times Notable Book. In 1998 he won the Writers Guild of America Award for Best TV Documentary for the A&E special "The Secret White House Tapes," which he cowrote and coproduced. He lives in New York City.

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