Rollo's Museum

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Hogan & Thompson, 1841 - Museums - 187 pages
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Page 172 - Hollo waited until he was tired, and then he had to wait some time longer. At length his father and mother appeared, and Rollo jumped out, and asked his father if he might ride in the wagon, and drive the girls again. " No," replied his father, " I have made another arrangement. Jonas," he continued, " you may get into the wagon, and drive on alone.
Page 169 - You see that large island off to the right," said Hollo's father, directing her attention in the right quarter. "Yes, I see it— Hollo!" "Well, that is George's Island. There is a rock lying just about south of it.
Page 172 - That is true," said his father. "And I do not think I was in any danger." " I do not think you were myself," said his father. " Then why did you send me back ? ' " For two reasons. First, you disobeyed me.
Page 168 - ... thought there would be time to go. So he turned his horse's head in the right direction, and they went to the cliffs. The precipices were very high, and the swell of the sea dashed and roared against them at their foot ; and yet the water looked very smooth at a little distance from 1 the land. Hollo wondered why there should be waves along the beach and against the rocks, when there were none out in the open sea. " I should think, father," said he, " that it would be calmer near the shore, and...
Page 172 - Then why did you send me back ? " For two reasons. First, you disobeyed me." " But I do not think I came before you more than an inch.
Page 5 - ... the Evidences of Christianity. New York, 1835. China and the English. New York, 1835. (22) Mt. Vernon Reader. New York, 1835. (23) Mt. Vernon Arithmetics. (24) Harper's School History. (25) The Teacher. Boston, 1833. (26) Caleb in the Country. (27) Caleb in Town. Boston, 1839. (28-41) Rollo Books: Rollo Learning to Talk; To Read; At Work; At Play; At School; Vacations; Experiments; Musenm; Travels; Correspondence; Water; Air; Fire; Sky.
Page 174 - I only meant to show you that it does not always require real danger, to make any one uneasy and anxious. When we see persons in situations which strongly suggest the idea of danger to our minds, it makes us uneasy, though we may know that there is no actual danger in the case. Thus it is painful to most persons to see a carpenter upon a very lofty spire, or to go very near a precipice, or see any body else go, even when there is a strong railing ; and so in all other cases. Therefore, our rule ought...
Page 175 - Thus it is painful to most persons to see a carpenter upon a very lofty spire, or to go very near a precipice, or see any body else go, even when there is a strong railing; and so in all other cases. Therefore, our rule ought always to be,, when we are in company with others, not only not to go into actual danger, but not to go so near as strongly to bring up the idea to their minds, and thus distress them.

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