Romeo and Juliet

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Saddleback Educational Publ, Aug 1, 2006 - Juvenile Fiction - 48 pages
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Shakespeare's plays are thought-provoking and complex texts that explore the human themes of romance, deceit, tragedy, comedy, and revenge. These activity guides are designed by teachers for teachers to help students navigate the complexity. Each guide contains a total of 30 activities divided into six sections of four activities and one review. At the end of each guide is a final test, a variety of culminating activities, and an answer key. Each reproducible activity eBook is approximately 68-pages
 

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Contents

Current Events in Meter The Prologue
1
Three Civil Brawls Act one Scene 1
2
Love Is in the Air Act One
3
Gossip Columnist at the Ball Act one Scene 5
4
Review
5
The Balcony Rap Act two Scene 2
6
Love Opinionnaire Act two Scene 2
7
Friar Lawrence Act two Scene 3
8
Headlining Act three
22
Review
23
The Friars Plan Act four Scene 1
25
Juliets Fears Act four Scene 3
26
Juliets Letter of Explanation Act four Scene 5
27
Comic Relief Act four Scene 5
28
Review
29
The Poor Apothecary Act five Scene 1
30

Figures of Speech Act two
9
Figures of Speech continued
10
Review
11
Mad Mercutio
12
Mad Mercutio continued
13
O I am fortunes fool Act three Scene 1
14
Telling It to the Prince Act three Scene 1
15
What the Servant Said Act three Scene 2
16
Review
17
Romeo the Outlaw Act three Scene 3
18
The Friar Speaks Up Act three Scene 3
19
The Friar Speaks Up continued
20
Writing a Soliloquy Act three Scene 5
21
The Letter Act five Scene 3
31
Obituaries
32
An Interview with the Friar Act five
33
Review
34
Happy Ending?
38
Shakespeares Words Today
39
Retelling the Story from a Different Perspective
40
The Verona Daily Times
41
Romeo and Juliet the Condensed Version
42
Who Is to Blame?
43
Answer Key
44
Copyright

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Page 10 - Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night : It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden ; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be, Ere one can say — It lightens.
Page 10 - Who lets it hop a little from her hand, Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves, And with a silk thread plucks it back again, So loving-jealous of his liberty.
Page 35 - What's in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet: So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title.
Page 34 - Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers
Page 9 - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
Page 9 - O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art As glorious to this night, being o'er my head, As is a winged messenger of heaven Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him, When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds And sails upon the bosom of the air.
Page xv - But Shakespeare still had what is considered his finest writing to do. He began his writing of tragedies beginning with Hamlet in 1600. In the following five years, Shakespeare wrote Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. Why Shakespeare turned to these darker, more serious themes is widely debated by scholars. But all agree that these plays established Shakespeare's premier place in English literature. Toward the end of 1609 through 1610, Shakespeare began to write his problem romances. These works, The...
Page xv - Armada in 1588, when Shakespeare was about 24 years old. Queen Elizabeth was skillful in navigating through the conflicts of religion. She maintained religious independence from Rome as the Church of England became firmly rooted during her reign. Additionally, she financed the establishment of colonies in America to grow the British Empire and expand its economic opportunities. At the end of her reign, England was the leader in trade, naval power, and culture. Because of its role as the main economic,...
Page xvi - ... to a nice sheen, while the other side was rough. Meals were served on the rough side of the board, and then it was flipped for a more elegant look in the room. The table is where we get the terms "room and board" and having "the tables turned." Another important part of a middle or an upper-class home was the bed. Rather than being made of prickly straw, mattresses were now stuffed with softer feathers. Surrounded by artistically carved four posts, these beds were considered so valuable that...
Page xii - Sound effects suggesting thunder, horses, or war were common. Music was important, and drums and horns were often played. Most important to the sense of spectacle were the costumes worn by the actors. These were elaborate, colorful, and very expensive. Therefore, they often purchased these outfits from servants who had inherited the clothes from their masters, or from hangmen, who received the clothes of their victims as payment for their services. Though Shakespeare's stage directions are sparse,...

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