Rosalyn Yalow, Nobel Laureate

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Basic Books, Jan 7, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 277 pages
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The biography of Rosalyn Yalow, as told by her longtime friend and colleague Eugene Straus, is the story of a woman who prevailed against class and gender prejudice to reach the pinnacle of the science world. Yalow's story is related against the backdrop of her later years, when, after having won the Nobel Prize in medicine for inventing a revolutionary test for certain kinds of hormones, she was suddenly felled by a stroke and brought to a hospital where, unrecognized, she was “dumped” as a charity case onto another hospital. Straus's account of Yalow's slow but ultimate triumph over crippling illness is of a piece with that of the dazzlingly talented and tenacious young woman who, despite the barriers placed before her by a male-dominated medical establishment, never compromised her principles of hard work and scientific integrity.
 

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Contents

Dumped
21
Paper Twine and Collars
43
Making a Way and a Place
69
The Shield around the Maiden
85
Berson and Yalow
113
Mother
155
Professional Mother
191
Transfiguration
231
Recalled to Life
255
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About the author (2000)

Eugene Straus, M.D., is professor of medicine and chief of digestive diseases at the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn. He was co-chairman with Rosalyn Yalow of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Montefiore Medical Center. He lives in New York City.

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