Routledge Handbook of Internet Politics

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Andrew Chadwick, Philip N. Howard
Taylor & Francis, 2010 - Law - 512 pages
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The politics of the internet has entered the social science mainstream. From debates about its impact on parties and election campaigns following momentous presidential contests in the United States, to concerns over international security, privacy and surveillance in the post-9/11, post-7/7 environment; from the rise of blogging as a threat to the traditional model of journalism, to controversies at the international level over how and if the internet should be governed by an entity such as the United Nations; from the new repertoires of collective action open to citizens, to the massive programs of public management reform taking place in the name of e-government, internet politics and policy are continually in the headlines.

The Routledge Handbook of Internet Politics is a collection of over thirty chapters dealing with the most significant scholarly debates in this rapidly growing field of study. Organized in four broad sections: Institutions, Behavior, Identities, and Law and Policy, the Handbook summarizes and criticizes contemporary debates while pointing out new departures. A comprehensive set of resources, it provides linkages to established theories of media and politics, political communication, governance, deliberative democracy and social movements, all within an interdisciplinary context. The contributors form a strong international cast of established and junior scholars.

This is the first publication of its kind in this field; a helpful companion to students and scholars of politics, international relations, communication studies and sociology.

 

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Contents

New directions in internet politics research
1
2 The internet in US election campaigns
13
Mobilization participation and change
25
The relative influence of national development political culture and web genre
40
Toward a comparative institutional approach
56
6 Technological change and the shifting nature of political organization
72
7 Making parliamentary democracy visible Speaking to with and for the public in the age of interactive technology
86
An institutional perspective
99
Transnational activism and social networks
246
Past present and future
261
20 New immigrants the internet and civic society
275
21 One Europe digitally divided
288
Internet use and political identity in the Arab world
305
23 The geopolitics of internet control Censorship sovereignty and cyberspace
323
Embracing the patterns of our lives
337
Factors shaping the political economy of property in cyberspace
349

The emergence of digitalera governance
114
The role of the internet in identifying deception during the 2004 US presidential campaign
131
Do the information rich get richer and the likeminded more similar?
144
12 Information the internet and direct democracy
157
Addressing inequality in the information age
173
Implications for modern democracies
186
15 Web 20 and the transformation of news and journalism
201
16 The internet and the changing global media environment
217
The internet the public sphere and beyond
230
Open source software and the global governance of intellectual property
364
The politics of protocols
376
Multistakeholder policymaking and the internet technocracy
384
29 Enabling effective multistakeholder participation in global internet governance through accessible cyberinfrastructure
401
The role of policymaking and political institutions
415
Political omnivores and wired states
424
Bibliography
435
Index
487
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About the author (2010)

Andrew Chadwick is Professor of Political Science and Founding Director of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London. He is the author of Internet Politics: States, Citizens, and New Communication Technologies (Oxford University Press), which won the American Sociological Association Communication and Information Technologies Section Outstanding Book Award.

Philip N. Howard is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington, and directs the World Information Access Project (www.wiareport.org). He is the author of New Media Campaigns and the Managed Citizen (Cambridge University Press), which won book awards from the American Sociological Association and the International Communication Association.

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