Ruby Developers Guide

Front Cover
Elsevier, Feb 6, 2002 - Computers - 520 pages
An expert guide to Ruby, a popular new Object-Oriented Programming Language

Ruby is quickly becoming a favourite among developers who need a simple, straight forward, portable programming language. Ruby is ideal for quick and easy object-oriented programming such as processing text files or performing system management. Having been compared with other programming languages such as Perl, Python, PCL, Java, Eiffel, and C++; Ruby is popular because of its straight forward syntax and transparent semantics.
Using step-by-step examples and real world applications, the Ruby Developer's Guide is designed for programmers and developer's looking to embrace the object-oriented features and functionality of this robust programming language. Readers will learn how to develop, implement, organize and deploy applications using Ruby.
  • Ruby is currently experiencing a rapid rise in popularity in the object-oriented programming community
  • Readers receive up-to-the minute links, white papers, and analysis for two years at solutions@syngress.com
  • Comes with a wallet-sized CD containing a printable HTML version of the book, all of the source code examples and demos of popular Ruby third-party programming tools and applications
 

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Contents

II
2
III
3
IV
4
V
23
VI
26
VII
27
VIII
38
IX
40
LIV
362
LV
384
LVI
401
LVII
421
LVIII
423
LIX
424
LXI
425
LXIII
443

XI
44
XIII
45
XIV
47
XV
69
XVI
91
XVII
112
XVIII
128
XIX
129
XX
130
XXI
131
XXII
133
XXIII
136
XXV
137
XXVII
191
XXVIII
196
XXIX
200
XXX
209
XXXII
212
XXXIII
213
XXXV
219
XXXVI
222
XXXVII
255
XXXVIII
257
XXXIX
258
XL
259
XLI
262
XLIII
263
XLV
285
XLVI
322
XLVII
337
XLIX
340
LI
341
LIII
356
LXIV
461
LXV
468
LXVI
483
LXVII
489
LXVIII
494
LXIX
499
LXX
512
LXXI
515
LXXII
516
LXXIV
517
LXXV
518
LXXVI
526
LXXVII
545
LXXVIII
559
LXXIX
566
LXXX
567
LXXXI
569
LXXXII
570
LXXXIII
571
LXXXIV
572
LXXXV
582
LXXXVI
611
LXXXVIII
613
LXXXIX
614
XCI
615
XCII
616
XCIII
659
XCIV
667
XCV
672
XCVI
675
XCVII
677
XCVIII
678
Copyright

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Page v - FridaYara of Publishers Group West for sharing their incredible marketing experience and expertise. Mary Ging, Caroline Hird, Simon Beale, Caroline Wheeler, Victoria Fuller, Jonathan Bunkell, and Klaus Beran of Harcourt International for making certain that our vision remains worldwide in scope.
Page v - Publishers for the enthusiasm with which they receive our books. Kwon Sung June at Acorn Publishing for his support. Jackie Gross, Gayle Voycey, Alexia Penny, Anik Robitaille, Craig Siddall, Darlene Morrow...
Page xxvi - Site contains the code files that are used in specific chapters of this book. The code files for each chapter are located in a "chXX
Page v - Miller, Jane Mackay, and Marie Skelly at Jackie Gross & Associates for all their help and enthusiasm representing our product in Canada. Lois Fraser, Connie McMenemy, Shannon Russell, and the rest of the great folks at Jaguar Book Group for their help with distribution of Syngress books in Canada.
Page v - Acknowledgments We would like to acknowledge the following people for their kindness and support in making this book possible. Richard Kristof, Duncan Anderson...
Page vii - Jonothon Ortiz is Vice President of Xnext, Inc. in Winter Haven, FL. Xnext, Inc. is a small, privately owned company that develops Web sites and applications for prestigious companies such as the New York Times Company.
Page 15 - ... element in the array, and so on. &, *, +, -, «, <=>, ==, ===, [], [], []=, assoc, at, clear, collect, collect!, compact, compact!, concat, delete, delete_at, delete_if, each, each_index, empty?, eql?, fill, first, flatten, flatten!, include?, index, indexes, indices, join, last, length, map!, new, nitems, pack, pop, push, rassoc, reject!, replace, reverse, reverse!, reverse_each, rindex, shift, size, slice, slice!, sort, sort!, to_a, to_ary, to_s, uniq, uniq!, unshift, If you see a method that...
Page 14 - Arrays are ordered, integer-indexed collections of any object. Array indexing starts at 0, as in C or Java. A negative index is assumed relative to the end of the array — that is, an index of -1 indicates the last element of the array, -2 is the next to last element in the array, and so on.

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