Rude Britannia: British comic art

Front Cover
Put together with some the country's best-known cartoonists and comedy writers, this exhibition explores British comic art from the 1600s to the present day. Bringing together a wide array of paintings, sculptures, film and photography, as well as graphic art and comic books, the exhibition celebrates a rich history of cartooning and visual jokes. The room on the Absurd is curated by comedian Harry Hill, and includes such diverse materials as Alice in Wonderland illustrations, David Shrigley's sculpture, and films by Edwina Ashton and Oliver Michaels. Within the Bawdy, Donald McGill's smutty seaside postcards can be seen with works by artists as different as Aubrey Beardsley, Sarah Lucas, and Grayson Perry. The rooms exploring Politics, Social Satire and Cruikshank's Victorian masterpiece The Worship of Bacchus, have been put together with Gerald Scarfe, Steve Bell, and the cartoonists from Viz. These show the power of comic art as a form of social and political commentary throughout history, from satires of Georgian society by Rowlandson and Gillray to Spitting Image's damning Thatcher puppet. Looking at comedy that is both timeless and of-its-time, Rude Britannia contrasts contemporary artists such as Angus Fairhurst with key historical pieces, and covers everything from Hogarth to the YBAs.

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Contents

Whats so Funny about British Art? Martin My rone
8
Carry On Tate Cedar Lewisohn
12
BRITISH COMIC
14
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (2010)

Martin Myrone is curator of 18th- and 19th-century British art, and Tim Batchelor is assistant curator, at Tate Britain.

Cedar Lewisohn is programmer for Tate Media.