Rudimentary Architecture: For the Use of Beginners, and Students. The Orders, and Their Aesthetic Principles

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J. Weale, 1852 - Architecture - 139 pages
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Page 58 - The capital has two rows of leaves, eight in each row, so disposed that of the taller ones, composing the upper row, one comes in the middle, beneath each face of the abacus, and the lower leaves alternate with the upper ones, coming between the stems of the latter; so that in the first or lower tier of leaves there is in the middle of each face, a space between two leaves occupied by the stem of the central leaf above them. Over these two rows is a third series of eight leaves, turned so as to support...
Page 64 - As may be supposed from this greatly increased depth of the cornice, it consists of a greater number of mouldings beneath the corona, for that and the cymatium over it invariably retain their places as the crowning members of the whole series of mouldings. To the dentels of the Ionic cornice is added a row of modillions, immediately beneath and supporting the corona. These modillions are ornamental blocks, curved in their under- surface somewhat after the manner of the letter S turned thus...
Page 21 - ... placed quite up to the edge or outer angle of the frieze. The mutules are thin plates or shallow blocks attached to the under side or soffit of the corona, over each triglyph and each metope, with the former of which they correspond in breadth, and their soffits or under-surfaces are wrought into three rows of guttae or drops, conical or otherwise shaped, each row consisting of six guttae, or the same number as those beneath each triglyph.
Page 74 - When, you have seen one green field," says Johnson, " you have seen all green fields ;" and so we may say of Greek temples, — when you have seen one or two of them, you have seen all of them. However they may differ from one another as to the treatment of the Order adopted for them, the number of their columns, and mere particulars of that kind, they resemble each other very nearly in all leading points. Not only were their plans invariably parallelograms, but alike also as to proportion, forming...
Page 35 - ... capital in the end column occasioned an offensive irregularity; for while all the other columns on the flanks showed the volutes, the end one showed the baluster side. It was necessary that the end column should, therefore, have two adjoining volute faces, which was effected by placing the volute at the angle diagonally, so as to obtain there two voluted surfaces placed immediately back to back. This same diagonal disposition of the volutes is employed for all the capitals alike, in Koman and...
Page 102 - Strike me, but hear," says he, and the fury of his antagonist redounds to his own discomfiture. — (pp. 141, 142.) No Innovation 1 — To say that all new things are bad, is to say that all old things were bad in their commencement : for of all the old things ever seen or heard of, there is not one that was not once new. Whatever is now establishment was once innovation. The first inventor of pews and parish clerks, was no doubt considered as a Jacobin in his day.
Page 21 - ... the triglyphs is equal to the distance between them. In their earliest inception, they are supposed to represent the ends of timbers used to support the roof of the structure, and the ends of such timbers were finished in the manner described, in order to add to the attractiveness of the design. A peculiarity of the Grecian Doric frieze is that the end triglyphs, instead of being, like the others, in the same central line, or axis, as the columns beneath, are placed quite up to the edge or outer...
Page 16 - ... under-surfaces are wrought into three rows of guttae or drops, conical or otherwise shaped, each row consisting of six guttae, or the same number as those beneath each triglyph. Though a few exceptions to the contrary exist, the shaft of the Doric column was generally what is technically called fluted. The number of channels is either sixteen or twenty, afterwards increased in the other orders to twenty-four; for they are invariably of an even number, capable of being divided by four; so that...
Page 58 - Ionic, more by its deep and foliaged capital than by its proportions,—the columns of both have bases differing but little from each other, and their shafts are fluted in the same manner. Although the order itself is the most delicate and lightest of the three, the capital is the largest, being considerably more than a diameter in height, varying in different examples from one to one and a half diameter, upon the average about a diameter and a quarter. The capital has two rows of leaves, eight in...
Page 130 - A term applied by some writers, by way of distinction, to the cymatium on the sloping or raking cornices of a pediment, which superimposed moulding (as its name implies) was frequently largely developed, and enriched with an ornamental pattern.

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