Rudimentary architecture: for the use of beginners

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John Weale, 1849 - Architecture - 120 pages
 

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Page 45 - crowning city, whose merchants were princes, and whose traffickers were the honourable of the earth...
Page 126 - ... another constitute the best apartment in the castle: beyond them is the chapel, some parlours for common use, with rooms for the upper servants, composing the east front. The grand stairs, which lie beyond the hall, occupy an area of forty feet square. The kitchen, which is beyond the staircase to the west, is large, and, as well as the hall and chapel, goes up in height to the upper story of the house.
Page 1 - Asshur, the great grandson of Noah.* Jonah speaks of it as "an exceeding great city of three days' journey :" f it is described by Strabo as larger than Babylon : the walls, according to Diodorus, were 100 feet high, and so broad that three chariots might be driven on them abreast : upon the walls stood 1500 towers, each 200 feet in height ; and the whole was so strong as to be deemed impregnable. That this city must have been one of great gran* Genesis x. 11. "Out of that land went forth Asshur,...
Page 3 - ... workmen in the rubbish. In all these excavations, walls of burnt brick, laid in lime mortar of a very good quality, are seen ; and in addition to the substances generally strewed on the surfaces of all these mounds, we here find fragments of alabaster vessels, fine earthen-ware, marble, and great quantities of varnished tiles, the glazing and colouring of which are surprisingly fresh. In a hollow near the southern part I found a sepulchral urn of earthen-ware, which had been broken in digging,...
Page i - ARCHITECTURE— STYLES— The History and Description of . the Styles of Architecture of Various Countries, from the Earliest to the ":. Present Period. By T. TALBOT BURY, FRIBA, &c. Illustrated. 2s. %* ORDERS AND STYLES OF ARCHITECTURE, in One Vol..
Page 26 - In Constantinople alone, and the adjacent suburbs, he dedicated twenty-five churches to the honour of Christ, the Virgin, and the saints. Most of these churches were decorated with marble and gold ; and their various situation was skilfully chosen in a populous square or a pleasant grove, on the margin of the sea-shore, or on some lofty eminence which overlooked the continents of Europe and Asia. The...
Page 9 - ... work, and most probably keeping the smoothest side outwards to form the face of the work. The workmanship of these walls is nothing more than that of the modern fencing without mortar, the interstices between the larger stones being filled up with others of smaller size, unworked, and merely heaped on one another. Pausanias informs us, that when the Argives attempted to destroy Tiryns, the walls were so strong that they could not throw them down : he also describes them to be equally worthy of...

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