Rudimentary architecture: for the use of beginners

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1853
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Page i - ARCHITECTURE— STYLES— The History and Description of . the Styles of Architecture of Various Countries, from the Earliest to the ":. Present Period. By T. TALBOT BURY, FRIBA, &c. Illustrated. 2s. %* ORDERS AND STYLES OF ARCHITECTURE, in One Vol..
Page 128 - ... another constitute the best apartment in the castle: beyond them is the chapel, some parlours for common use, with rooms for the upper servants, composing the east front. The grand stairs, which lie beyond the hall, occupy an area of forty feet square. The kitchen, which is beyond the staircase to the west, is large, and, as well as the hall and chapel, goes up in height to the upper story of the house.
Page 24 - In Constantinople alone, and the adjacent suburbs, he dedicated twenty-five churches to the honour of Christ, the Virgin, and the saints. Most of these churches were decorated with marble and gold ; and their various situation was skilfully chosen in a populous square or a pleasant grove, on the margin of the sea-shore, or on some lofty eminence which overlooked the continents of Europe and Asia. The...
Page 19 - The basilicae, or halls of justice of the ancient Romans, were undoubtedly the types from which the early Christian places of worship were taken ; and the ruins of these buildings were the chief materials used. In several instances the columns that divide the centre part of the church from the aisles have been taken from other edifices, either on account of the want of artists capable of executing anything equal to them, or the haste with which they were erected. The expedient that was adopted tends...
Page 7 - ... work, and most probably keeping the smoothest side outwards to form the face of the work. The workmanship of these walls is nothing more than that of the modern fencing without mortar, the interstices between the larger stones being filled up with others of smaller size, unworked, and merely heaped on one another. Pausanias informs us, that when the Argives attempted to destroy Tiryns, the walls were so strong that they could not throw them down : he also describes them to be equally worthy of...
Page 3 - ... feet in height ; the third, 400 feet square, and 160 feet in height. About 300 paces from the second pyramid stands the gigantic statue of the Sphinx, whose length, from the forepart to the tail, has been found to be 125 feet. Belzoni cleared away the sand, and found a temple between the legs, and another in one of its paws.
Page 1 - Nitocris, a queen of Babylon, to connect the two parts of the city divided by the Euphrates. The piers were formed of large hewn stones, and in order to fix them in the river the waters of the Euphrates were turned into a great excavation, leaving the bed of the river dry. It was at this time that the banks of the river were lined with the walls, and the descents to the river from the smaller gates were...
Page 16 - Augustus produced the most brilliant results, and has caused a veneration for the age in which he lived. The perfection which literature and architecture attained during his dominion effected more towards immortalizing Rome than all the conquests of its emperors, and raised its inhabitants to a state of civilization never before equalled. By him was erected the temple and forum of Mars the Avenger, the theatre of Marcellus, and a large number of other public buildings. His boast was not a vain one,...
Page 13 - Christian era, during the time of the wars that were carried on be- , tween the Persians and the principal states of Greece, and to which the greatest prosperity of the Athenians may be attributed: literature was cultivated, and the arts of architecture and sculpture, which were employed to ornament the city, were carried to a degree of excellence that has never been surpassed. Greece was conquered by the Romans 146 B. c., and became a Roman province, although Athens and Delphi were declared as free...
Page 38 - Gothic ought properly and truly to be named the Saracenic architecture, refined by the Christians; which first of all began in the East, after the fall of the Greek empire...

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