Rumford fireplaces and how they are made

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W. T. Comstock, 1906 - Fireplaces - 198 pages
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Page 117 - ... to them. The bringing forward of the Fire into the room, or rather bringing it nearer to the front of the opening of the Fire-place; — and the diminishing of the throat of the Chimney, being two objects principally had in view in the alterations in Fire-places here recommended, it is evident that both these may be attained merely by bringing forward the back of the Chimney. — The...
Page 65 - ... much crowded by company, nor filled with a great many burning lamps or candles, the air in them is seldom so much injured as to become oppressive or unwholesome; and those who inhabit them show, by their ruddy countenances, as well as by every other sign of perfect health, that they suffer no inconvenience whatever from their closeness. There is frequently, it is true, an oppressiveness in the air of the room...
Page 131 - Fire-place is finished, this door-way is to be closed by a few bricks, by a tile, or a fit piece of stone, placed in it, dry, or without mortar, and confined in its place by means of a rabbet made for that purpose in the brick-work. — As often as the Chimney is swept, the Chimney-sweeper takes down this temporary wall, which is very easily done, and when he has finished his work, he puts it again into its place. — The annexed drawing (No.
Page 67 - Though a room be closed in the most perfect manner possible, yet, as the quantity of air injured and rendered unfit for further use by the respiration of two or three persons in a few hours is very small, compared to the immense volume of air which a room of a moderate...
Page 159 - The flame rising from the fire broke against the part of the back which sloped forward over the fire, and this part of the back being soon very much heated, and in consequence of its being very hot, (and when the fire burnt bright it was frequently quite red hot,) it threw off into the room a great deal of radiant heat.
Page 65 - ... show by their ruddy countenances, as well as by every other sign of perfect health, that they suffer no inconvenience whatever from their closeness. — There is frequently, it is true, an oppressiveness in the air of a room heated by a German stove, of which those who are not much accustomed to living in those rooms seldom fail to complain, and indeed with much reason; but this oppressiveness does not arise from the air of the room being injured by the respiration and perspiration of those who...
Page 59 - ... and this merely by throwing open for a moment a door opening into some passage from whence fresh air may be had, and the upper part of a window; or by opening the upper part of one window and the lower part of another. And as the operation of ventilating the room, even when it is done in. the most complete manner, will never require the door and window to be open more than one minute, in this short time the walls of the room will not be sensibly cooled, and the fresh air which comes into the...
Page 101 - Now, as bodies' which absorb radiant heat are necessarily heated in consequence of that absorption, to discover which of the various materials that can be employed for constructing fireplaces are best adapted for that purpose, we have only to find out by an experiment, very easy to be made, what bodies acquire least heat when exposed to the direct rays of a clear fire ; for those which are least heated evidently absorb the least, and consequently reflect the most radiant heat. And hence it appears...
Page 157 - ... be too abrupt, yet it ought to be quite finished at the height of eight or ten inches above the fire, otherwise it may perhaps cause the chimney to smoke; but when it is very near the fire, the heat of the fire will enable the current of rising smoke to overcome the obstacle which this slope will oppose to its ascent, which it would not do so easily were the slope situated at a greater distance from the burning fuel.
Page 63 - ... yet when these rooms are tolerably large, and when they are not very much crowded by company, nor filled with a great many burning lamps or candles, the air in them is seldom so much injured as to become oppressive or unwholesome; and those who inhabit them show by their ruddy countenances, as...

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