Running the Rift

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Algonquin Books, Jan 3, 2012 - Fiction - 336 pages
19 Reviews
"Running the Rift" follows the progress of Jean Patrick Nkuba from the day he knows that running will be his life to the moment he must run to save his life. A naturally gifted athlete, he sprints over the thousand hills of Rwanda and dreams of becoming his country's first Olympic medal winner in track. But Jean Patrick is a Tutsi in a world that has become increasingly restrictive and violent for his people. As tensions mount between the Hutu and Tutsi, he holds fast to his dream that running might deliver him, and his people, from the brutality around them. Winner of the Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction, Naomi Benaron has written a stunning and gorgeous novel that--through the eyes of one unforgettable boy-- explores a country's unraveling, its tentative new beginning, and the love that binds its people together.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Smits - LibraryThing

Running the Rift is a slow moving novel but it is never boring. It gives great detail into what it is like as a young person growing up in Rwanda in political upheaval. I learned what being a student ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - klburnside - LibraryThing

The story of a boy during the Rwanda genocide. Depressing of course. Somehow I didn't feel very connected to the characters and didn't think the story moved along enough to keep my attention. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

BOOK TWO
117
BOOK THREE
269
BOOK FOUR
313
BOOK FIVE
329
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
363
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Naomi Benaron earned an MFA from Antioch University and an MS in earth sciences from Scripps Institute of Oceanography. She teaches at Pima Community College and online through the Afghan Womenrsquo;s Writing Project. An advocate for African refugees in her community, she has worked extensively with genocide survivor groups in Rwanda. She has won the G. S. Sharat Chandra Prize for Short Fiction and the Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition. She is also an Ironman triathlete.

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