Rural Improvement: The Principles of Civic Art Applied to Rural Conditions, Including Village Improvement and the Betterment of the Open Country

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Orange Judd Company, 1914 - Country life - 265 pages
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Page 102 - And beside a' that and a' that, the East is blessed with good winters and blossoming clouds that shed white flowers over all the land, covering every scar and making the saddest landscape divine at least once a year. The most extensive, least spoiled, and most unspoilable of the gardens of the continent are the vast tundras of Alaska.
Page 56 - ... purposes; The establishing of a highway engineering service, or equivalent organization, to be at the call of the states in working out effective and economical highway systems...
Page 82 - ... would be an embezzlement by one man of God's gift to all. A capitalist might as well curtain off a star, or have the monopoly of an hour. Doors may lock, but out-doors is a freehold to feet and eyes.
Page 102 - ... taken as pastures at the rate of one or two square miles per cow, and of course their plant treasures are passing away, — the delicate abronias, phloxes, gilias, etc. Only a few of the bitter, thorny, unbitable shrubs are left, and the sturdy cactuses that defend themselves with bayonets and spears. Most of the wild plant wealth of the East also has vanished, — gone into dusty history. Only vestiges of its glorious prairie and woodland wealth remain to bless humanity in boggy, rocky, unploughable...
Page 82 - ... rivulets, would be an embezzlement by one man of God's gift to all. A capitalist might as well curtain off a star, or have the monopoly of an hour. Doors may lock, but out-doors is a freehold to feet and...
Page xv - ... appreciation. These efforts will be continued, but they will be given direction and practicalness. The provision of this ideal, the setting before all the people of a tangible vision of their own possible city beautiful, will have other value than merely that of popular education. It will offer them inspiration. Nor will this inspiration be material only, but as clearly moral and political and intellectual. The pride that enables a man to proclaim himself "a citizen of no mean city " awakens...
Page 119 - SARAH ORNE JEWETT, 1881. LD New England villages and small towns and well-kept New England farms had universally a simple and pleasing form of garden called the front yard or front dooryard. A few still may be seen in conservative communities in the New England states and in New York or Pennsylvania. I saw flourishing ones this summer in Gloucester, Marblehead, and Ipswich. Even where the front yard was but a narrow strip of land before a tiny cottage, it was carefully fenced in, with...
Page 159 - There are many misconceptions about city planning, but none is farther from the fact than the notion that comprehensive planning is only for big cities.
Page 102 - ... unbitable shrubs are left, and the sturdy cactuses that defend themselves with bayonets and spears. Most of the wild plant wealth of the East also has vanished, — gone into dusty history. Only vestiges of its glorious prairie and woodland wealth remain to bless humanity in boggy, rocky, unploughable places. Fortunately, some of these are purely wild, and go far to keep Nature's love visible. White water-lilies, with rootstocks deep and safe in mud, still send up every summer a Milky Way of...

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