Russia's Greatest Enemy?: Harold Williams and the Russian Revolutions

Front Cover
I. B. Tauris, Mar 15, 2007 - History - 288 pages
A remarkably talented linguist, foreign correspondent in Russia from 1904-1921 and Foreign Editor for 'The Times', 'Russia's Greatest Enemy?' traces the fascinating life and career of Harold Williams. This quiet and modest New Zealander played a central role in informing and influencing British opinion on Russia from the twilight of the Tsars, through War and Revolution, to the rise of the Soviet Union. The career of this keen Russophile and fierce opponent of Bolshevism illuminates the pre-World War One movement towards rapprochement with the Tsar, as well as the drive for intervention and isolation in the Soviet period. In this fascinating study Charlotte Alston explores the role of Williams as the interpreter of Russia to the British and the British to Russia in this turbulent period in the history of both countries.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Journalism 19001914
33
Britain Russia War and Revolution 19071917
76
From Revolution to Intervention 19171921
122
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Charlotte Alston is Research Assistant at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London.

Bibliographic information