Russian Entrepreneur: Publisher Ivan Sytin of Moscow, 1851-1934

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Aug 1, 1990 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 270 pages
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Not only did Ivan Dmitrievich Sytin build Sytin & Co. into the largest publishing concern in Russia prior to the Revolution, he also transformed Russian Word from an obscure, conservative newspaper into Russia's leading daily, with a circulation of over one million copies in 1917. Ruud shows that Sytin, a peasant-born villager who made millions in publishing, was truly an entrepreneur in the sense of Schumpeter's definition a risk-taker who is able to devise "new combinations of productive means."
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
From Villager to Moscow Publisher
7
More Presses for the People
22
Conniving to Establish Russian Word
39
Strikes Politicized Sons and Profits
56
Weathering the Revolution of 1905 and Its Aftermath
75
The Targeter Becomes Target
93
Leaning to the Left
109
Naked I Will Depart
165
Ivan Dmitrievich Sytin Russian Entrepreneur
190
Appendices
193
Notes After Visiting America by I D Sytin
195
Total Works Published by Sytin Co 190110
201
Data on the Production of Izvestiia of the Executive Committee
204
Notes
211
Bibliography
255

The Dilemmas of Overreach and Expansion
129
A Publisher Goes to War
148

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About the author (1990)

Charles A. Ruud is a professor of history at the University of Western Ontario and the author of several books on Russia, including Fontanka 16: The Tsars' Secret Police.

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