Russian Folk Belief

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M.E. Sharpe, Feb 15, 1989 - History
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Russian folk beliefs have left their mark, not only on superstitions and customs, but in music, art and some major literary works by the likes of Pushkin, Dostoevsky and Gogol. An exciting exploration of the Russian lower mythology, Russian Folk Belief offers a fascinating glimpse into the admixture of pagan and Christian elements which comprise the world view of the Russian peasant.
 

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Contents

The Pagan Background
3
Christian Personages
19
The Devil
38
Spirits of the House and Farmstead
51
Spirits of the Forest Waters and Fields
64
Russian Sorcery
83
Spoiling and Healing
103
Legends Tabulates and Memorates
127
The Domovoi and Other Domestic Spirits
169
Nature Spirits
178
Sorcerers and Witches
190
Notes
207
Bibliography
235
Subject Index
245
Place Name Index
253
Name Index
255

Creation Legends
130
Biblical Personages and Saints
136
Devils
154
About the Author
257
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Page xii - Life," in The Peasant in Nineteenth-Century Russia, ed. Wayne S. Vucinich (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1968), 1—40, is that of a man. The lament texts used are BE Chistov and KV Chistova, eds. , Prichitaniia. The account given excludes laments for recruits, which are a type of lament for a man. Laments about one's fate and about accidents are also excluded. It should also be noted that, of the eleven laments...

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