Russian Secret Tales: Bawdy Folktales of Old Russia

Front Cover
Genealogical Publishing Com, 1998 - Reference - 306 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
1
III
4
IV
6
V
7
VI
8
VII
9
VIII
11
X
13
XLII
102
XLIII
112
XLIV
124
XLV
127
XLVI
132
XLVII
135
XLVIII
141
XLIX
148

XII
15
XV
16
XVI
20
XVII
29
XVIII
34
XIX
35
XX
37
XXI
39
XXII
41
XXIII
42
XXIV
45
XXV
47
XXVI
49
XXVII
50
XXVIII
54
XXIX
56
XXX
57
XXXI
59
XXXII
65
XXXIII
77
XXXIV
79
XXXV
82
XXXVI
85
XXXVII
89
XXXVIII
93
XXXIX
94
XL
99
XLI
101
L
151
LI
156
LII
169
LIII
173
LIV
176
LV
178
LVI
180
LVII
181
LVIII
183
LIX
185
LX
186
LXI
187
LXII
188
LXIII
190
LXIV
200
LXV
216
LXVI
218
LXVII
223
LXVIII
230
LXIX
239
LXX
245
LXXI
248
LXXII
250
LXXIII
252
LXXIV
255
LXXV
259
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxxii - Their sexual humor is a sort of whistling in the dark, like Beaumarchais' Figaro, who "laughs so that he may not cry.
Page xxi - I urinate on your head' (among the Mongols usually given as 'I urinate on your father's head'), to which, as the insult par excellence, one may add the former remarks about the mother, and make the grand curse of 'I urinate on your father's head and have intercourse with your mother!
Page xxxii - ... perhaps out of his own (or her own) psychological need. The folktale or joke therefore represents a protective mechanism whereby the seriousness, and even the physical reality, of the situation can be denied and made light of by telling it — or by accepting some serious original anecdote describing it — simply as a joke, as something allowing the accumulated tension of living this situation, or telling about it, or listening to it, to relieve itself in the harmless but necessary explosion...
Page 11 - I am going to pass the night in a woman's slit." "And I am going into a woman's backside." They parted. The next day they met again. "Well, how did you sleep?
Page xxxviii - Rationale indicates that the book is an attempt to understand how "these stories and individuals do personify what the tellers and singers well know to be real but inexplicable peculiarities of human behavior, which they are attempting somehow to fit into a rational view of the world, whether as horror or as humor
Page xxxii - Well, would you tell me what might this here job be?" She said, "Well, you got to get down on your knees And eat this pussy like a rat eating cheese. You got to get way down in it and blow it like Louis blow his horn. You got to peck all around, like a rooster pecking corn." I said, "Hold it! Wait a minute, bitch, you're talking too fast. The next thing you know, you'll have my foot in your ass.
Page xii - The scientific collection and presentation of erotic folk material came of age, in a single bound, in Afanasyev's Russian Secret Tales. The stories are presented in prose dialogue, as they were collected, with a minimum of rewriting or literary titivation of the connective text, citing a few variants and parallels (as to Homer and Boccaccio), and without any attempt to expurgate or disguise the occasional obscene vocabulary by veiling this in the elegant Latin periphrases still deemed necessary to...

About the author (1998)

Anthropologist and folklorist Alan Dundes was born in 1934 in New York City. He received his BA in English in 1955 and his MAT in English in 1958, both from Yale University. He received his Ph.D in Folklore from Indiana University in 1962 and in 1963 he joined the teaching staff at the University of California, Berkley. He wrote over 250 journal articles and12 books and co-wrote more than 20 other books. In 1993, he became the first American to win the Pitre Prize's Sigillo d'Oro, which is an international life-time achievement award in folklore and ethnography. He died of a heart attack on March 30, 2004 at the age of 70.

Bibliographic information