SARS in Context: Memory, History, and Policy

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Oct 12, 2006 - Medical
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Former Ontario Chief Coroner James Young and infectious disease expert Dick Zoutman recount their efforts to contain the mysterious new disease. In answer to questions about "lessons from the past," several distinguished historians of epidemics examine how their knowledge of responses to older plagues influenced their perception of SARS. They also reflect on how the advent of SARS alters their views of the past. Finally, policy experts comment on possible changes to health care that the SARS experience suggests should be made.
 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
LESSONS AND DISAPPOINTMENTS
Part IMEMORYTWO MEDICAL OFFICIALS RECALL SARS IN TORONTO
2MY EXPERIENCE WITH SARS1
3REMEMBERING SARS AND THE ONTARIO SARS SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Part IIHISTORYHISTORIANS OF DISEASE REFLECT ON SARS
ii
4SARS AND PLAGUES PAST
ii
5SARS VIEWED FROM THE ETIOLOGICAL STANDPOINT
ii
TB AND THE PUBLIC HEALTH LEGACY OF SARS IN CANADA
ii
8SARS IN THE LIGHT OF SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASESAND AIDS
ii
Part IIIPUBLIC POLICYINTHE AFTERMATH OF SARS
iii
9INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC ISSUES IN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY
iv
DEFINING THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS ROLE IN PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCIES
xxiii
11THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF SARS AND PANDEMIC INFLUENZA
lv
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
34
INDEX
38

COMMUNICABLE DISEASECONTROL PROCEDURES IN TORONTO 1832 TO 2003
ii

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About the author (2006)

Jacalyn Duffin is professor in the Hannah Chair in History of Medicine, Queen’s University, and the author or several books, including Clio in the Clinic: History in Medical Practice.

Arthur Sweetman is director of the School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University, where he holds the Stauffer-Dunning Chair in Policy Studies, Queen’s University. He is the co-editor of Towards Evidence-Based Policy for Canadian Education.

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