SPEECHES IN THE SECOND AND THIRD SESSIONS OF THE THIRTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS, AND IN THE VACATION\

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Page 12 - The laws of the United States have been for some time past and now are opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed, in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law.
Page 130 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively...
Page 162 - When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood!
Page 203 - Every subject has a right to be secure from all unreasonable searches and seizures of his person, his houses, his papers, and all his possessions. All warrants, therefore, are contrary to this right., if the cause or foundation of them be not previously supported by oath or affirmation...
Page 47 - The modern usage of nations, which has become law," — mark the words, Mr. Speaker, — " the modern usage of nations, which has become law," — — " would be violated ; that sense of justice and of right, which is acknowledged and felt by the whole civilized world, would be outraged, — if private property should be generally confiscated, and private rights annulled.
Page 12 - The details for this object will be immediately communicated to the State authorities through the War Department. I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government; and to redress wrongs already long enough endured.
Page 47 - The people change their allegiance ; their relation to their ancient sovereign is dissolved ; but their relations to each other, and their rights of property, remain undisturbed. If this be the modern rule, even in cases of conquest, who can doubt its application to the case of an amicable cession of territory...
Page 203 - EVERY subject of the Commonwealth ought to find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property, or character. He ought to obtain right and justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it; completely, and without any denial; promptly, and without delay; conformably to the laws.
Page 199 - ... and condemnation of such offenders, and them to cause to be executed and put to death according to the law martial.
Page 198 - Charter and the law of the land ; and by the said Great Charter and other the laws and statutes of this your realm, no man ought to be adjudged to death but by the laws established in this your realm, either by the customs of the same realm, or by acts of parliament...

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