S. 442, the Internet Tax Freedom Act: Hearing Before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, U.S. House of Representatives

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Conrad Burns
DIANE Publishing, Jun 1, 1997 - 83 pages
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Witnesses include: Senators Conrad Burns, Byron L. Dorgan, John McCain, and Ron Wyden; Wade Anderson, Director of Tax Policy, Office of the State Comptroller, State of Texas; Representatives Christopher Cox and Rich White; Kendall L. Houghton, general counsel, Committee on State Taxation; Timothy M. Kaine, Richmond city councilman, National League of Cities, Richmond, VA; Linda Rankin, general counsel, Bear Creek Corporation; Lawrence H. Summers, Deputy Secretary, Department of the Treasury; and James Walton, member, Association of Online Professionals.
 

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Page 72 - ... would result from enactment of this legislation. In any case, the legislation would be likely to create even more nonuniformity in State taxation of electronic commerce, as State courts would issue inconsistent decisions on which State and local taxes and tax practices were and were not preempted. State and local governments have helped create the new information-age economy by educating the citizenry. Achieving and maintaining a world-class education system is critical to the United States continuing...
Page 21 - ... as well as national security. By one estimate, two-thirds of US workers are in information-related jobs, and the rest are in industries that rely heavily on information. In an era of global markets and global competition, the technologies to create, manipulate, manage and use information are of strategic importance for the United States. Those technologies will help US businesses remain competitive and create challenging, high-paying jobs. They will also fuel economic growth which, in turn, will...
Page 77 - Internet access charges are subject to sales and use taxes as "computer services." Fortunately for Pennsylvania-based Internet access providers, legislation enacted last month, provides that computer services will not be subject to a sales tax in Pennsylvania after 1 For example, the April 7, 1997 issue of State Tax Notes includes three such articles, Kutten, Electronic Commerce and Tax Law: Two Often-Overlooked Issues, Steele, Nexus at the Dawn of the Electronic Commerce Revolution, and Hamilton,...
Page 23 - Development, has been leading an interagency working group that is developing a set of principles to guide government's role in promoting electronic commerce. These principles deal with financial issues, such as tariffs, taxation and electronic money; legal issues, such as a "Uniform Commercial Code" for electronic commerce, intellectual property protection, privacy, and security; and market access issues, such as telecommunications infrastructure and information technology, content regulation, and...
Page 23 - President should seek bilateral and multinational agreements to establish that "activity on the Internet and interactive computer services is free from tariff and taxation." Treasury fully supports the goals and underlying objectives of this Bill. The growth of the Internet, and the resulting growth in electronic commerce, is one of the most exciting technological and business developments of our era. As President Clinton has said, 'The day is coming when every home will...
Page 21 - US workers are in information-related jobs, and the rest are in industries that rely heavily on information. In an era of global markets and global competition, the technologies to create, manipulate, manage and use information are of strategic importance for the United States. Those technologies will help US businesses remain competitive and create challenging, high-paying jobs. They will also fuel economic growth which, in turn, will generate a steadily-increasing standard of living for all Americans....
Page 2 - To establish a national policy against State and local government interference with interstate commerce on the Internet or interactive computer services, and to exercise Congressional jurisdiction over interstate commerce by establishing a moratorium on the imposition of exactions that would interfere with the free flow of commerce via the Internet, and for other purposes.
Page 22 - You will be able to live in many places without foregoing opportunities for useful and fulfilling employment, by "telecommuting" to your office through an electronic highway instead of by automobile, bus or train. Small manufacturers will be able to get orders from all over the world electronically — with detailed specifications — in a form that the machines will use to produce the necessary items. You will be able to see the latest movies, play the best video games, or bank and shop from the...
Page 77 - While some of these articles report on concrete developments, they more typically explore broad-brush concepts, and hypothesize on how such concepts should apply to this brave new and changing world. The vacuum which exists with regard to any clear set of rules for local taxation of electronic commerce is clearly attracting the attention of the business world. While writers debate how the Internet should be taxed, state and local taxing authorities are moving quickly to modify or reinterpret their...
Page 1 - US SENATE, SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS, COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION, Washington, DC. The subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 9:30 am, in room SR-253, Russell Senate Office Building, Hon.

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