Sab and Autobiography

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, Jun 4, 2010 - Fiction - 185 pages

Eleven years before Uncle Tom's Cabin fanned the fires of abolition in North America, an aristocratic Cuban woman told an impassioned story of the fatal love of a mulatto slave for his white owner's daughter. So controversial was Sab's theme of miscegenation and its parallel between the powerlessness and enslavement of blacks and the economic and matrimonial subservience of women that the book was not published in Cuba until 1914, seventy-three years after its original 1841 publication in Spain.

Also included in the volume is Avellaneda's Autobiography (1839), whose portrait of an intelligent, flamboyant woman struggling against the restrictions of her era amplifies the novel's exploration of the patriarchal oppression of minorities and women.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
25
V
27
VI
34
VII
38
VIII
44
IX
49
X
55
XIV
76
XV
87
XVI
95
XVII
103
XVIII
113
XIX
120
XX
127
XXI
134

XI
60
XII
64
XIII
70
XXII
149
XXIII
155
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