Sabina, Volume 1

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Page 292 - For mine is the lay that lightly floats, And mine are the murmuring, dying notes, That fall as soft as snow on the sea, And melt in the heart as instantly...
Page 308 - Then sailors think of their far-distant home, And of those friends they ne'er may see again ; But when the fight's begun, Each serving at his gun Should any thought of them come o'er your mind ; Think, only, should the day be won, How 'twill cheer Their hearts to hear That their old companion he was one. Or, my lad, if you a mistress kind Have left on shore, some pretty girl and true, Who many a night doth listen to the wind, And sighs to think how it may fare with you : Oh, when the fight's begun...
Page 9 - Whoso hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?
Page 308 - twill cheer Their hearts to hear That their old companion he was one ! Or, my lad, if you a mistress kind Have left on shore, some pretty girl, and true ; Who many a night doth listen to the wind, And sighs to think how it may fare with you: O when the fight's begun, Each serving at his gun...
Page 251 - WILL you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly; " 'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy ; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to show when you are there." " Oh, no, no," said the little Fly ; " to ask me is in vain, For who goes up your winding stair can ne'er come down again.
Page 41 - With Palamon above the rest in place, Lycurgus came, the surly king of Thrace ; Black was his beard, and manly was his face...
Page 23 - Help us to show the fruits of the spirit; love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance.
Page 207 - Till harmony rouse ev'ry gentle passion, Teach the cold maid to lose her fears in love, And the fierce youth to languish at her feet. Begin: ev'n age itself is cheer'd with music; It wakes a glad remembrance of our youth, Calls back past joys, and warms us into transport...
Page 25 - Children like tender osiers take the bow, And as they first are fashion'd, always grow, For what we learn in youth, to that alone In age, we are by second nature, prone.
Page 229 - Ordinary expense ooght to be limited by a man's estate, and ordered to the best, that the bills may be less than the estimation abroad.

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