Sacred Earth: The Spiritual Landscape of Native America

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Inner Traditions / Bear & Co, 1992 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 162 pages
This eye-opening journey through the terrain of Native American spirituality contrasts contemporary society's rejection of the sacred--and its arrogant belief in its own power to control the cosmos--with native traditions of reverence for the earth. The author reconstructs the archetypal and symbolic significance of indigenous rituals and sacred sites, placing Native American spirituality in the context of the world's great religions. The comparison illustrates the richness and universality of the native approach to the earth as a cherished being and reveals the poverty of our present-day attitudes toward the natural environment and its living creatures. This book is an urgent call to rediscover and become firmly grounded on the sacred earth again.
 

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Sacred earth: the spiritual landscape of native America

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Versluis, editor of Avaloka: A Journal of Traditional Religion and Culture , offers a much-needed understanding of Native American religion. Through discussion of how the religions of Native Americans ... Read full review

Contents

NATURE AS THEOPHANY
9
WAKAN ORENDA MANITOU
14
TIMELESSNESS AND TIME
21
TOTEMIC REVELATIONS
28
SACRED MAN AND THE GREAT MYSTERY
35
SPIRITUAL SYMBOLISM
43
INTRODUCTION
45
INSCRIPTIONS IN STONE
48
INTRODUCTION
89
LANGUAGE OF THE EARTH LANGUAGE OF THE SKY
91
CELESTIAL AGRICULTURE CELESTIAL JOURNEY
95
SPIRITUAL LANDSCAPE
102
MOUNTAINS AND FIRE WINDS AND WATERS
113
THE COUNCIL FIRE
119
THE SONGS OF SOLITUDE AND SILENCE
126
CONCLUSION
133

THE GREAT HORNED SERPENT
56
THE STONE MAN
67
THE GREAT LODGE AS MICROCOSMOS
74
INITIATION AND ITS INVERSIONS
82
SPIRITUAL LANDSCAPE
87
APPENDIX
139
NOTES
145
BIBLIOGRAPHY
156
INDEX
160
Copyright

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Page 5 - They had what the world has lost. They have it now. What the world has lost, the world must have again lest it die.

About the author (1992)

Versluis, editor of Avaloka: A Journal of Traditional Religion and Culture, offers a much-needed understanding of Native American religion. Through discussion of how the religions of Native Americans compare with traditional religions, he finds ground for a common spirituality. While contemporary society emphasizes ecology, Versluis points out that Native Americans always had a love and respect for the environment and a recognition of the spiritual qualities of nature. This book may prove a bit difficult for lay readers, yet it is necessary reading for those seeking a greater understanding of Native American spirituality. For Native American and religion collections.

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