Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Management

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Taylor & Francis, 1999 - Nature - 209 pages
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Dr Berkes approaches traditional ecological knowledge as a knowledge-practice-belief complex. This complex considers four interrelated levels: local knowledge (species specific); resource management systems (integrating local knowledge with practice); social institutions (rules and codes of behavior); and world view (religion, ethics, and broadly defined belief systems). Divided into three parts that deal with concepts, practice, and issues, respectively, the book first discusses the emergence of the field, its intellectual roots and global significance. Substantive material is then included on how traditional ecological and management systems actually work. At the same time it explores a diversity of relationships that different groups have developed with their environment, using extensive case studies from research conducted with the Cree Indians of James Bay, in the eastern subarctic of North America. The final section examines traditional knowledge as a challenge to the positivist-reductionist paradigm in Western science, and concludes with a discussion of the potential of traditional ecological knowledge to inject a measure of ethics into the science of ecology and resource management.
 

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Contents

Context of Traditional Ecological Knowledge
3
Emergence of the Field
17
1ntellectual Roots of Traditional Ecological
37
PRACTlCE
59
Cree Worldview from the 1nside
79
A Story of Caribou and Social Learning
95
Cree Fishing Practices as Adaptive Management
111
lSSUES
129
Cultivating Sea Moss in St Lucia
135
Challenges to 1ndigenous Knowledge
145
Toward a Unity of Mind and Nature
163
References
185
lndex
203
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About the author (1999)

Fikret Berkes, of the Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, has previously co-edited Linking Social and Ecological Systems 0521 785626.

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