Saint George: Champion of Christendom and Patron Saint of England

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S. Sonnenschein & Company, 1907 - 142 pages
 

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Page 53 - I made them lay their hands in mine and swear To reverence the King, as if he were Their conscience, and their conscience as their King, To break the heathen and uphold the Christ...
Page 33 - A litle glooming light, much like a shade, By which he saw the ugly monster plaine, Halfe like a serpent horribly displaide, But th' other halfe did womans shape retaine, Most.
Page 33 - Errours den, A monster vile, whom God and man does hate: Therefore I read beware. Fly fly (quoth then The fearefull Dwarfe:) this is no place for living men.
Page 61 - The old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfils himself in many ways, Lest one good custom should corrupt the world Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me?
Page 64 - For herein may be seen noble chivalry, courtesy, humanity, friendliness, hardiness, love, friendship, cowardice, murder, hate, virtue, and sin. Do after the good and leave the evil, and it shall bring you to good fame and renown.
Page 15 - O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flics.
Page 64 - ... which we may come and attain to good fame and renown in this life, and after this short and transitory life to come unto everlasting bliss in heaven ; the which He grant us that reigneth in heaven, the blessed Trinity.
Page 110 - ... young singingboy to bring us a copy of the anthem to be sung. And here, for our sakes, had this anthem and the great service sung extraordinary, only to entertain us. It is a noble place indeed, and a good Quire of voices. Great bowing by all the people, the poor Knights in particularly, to the Altar.
Page 105 - ... thy father's head.' Upon which the child looked very steadfastly upon him. ' Heed, my child, what I say ; they will cut off my head, and perhaps make thee a king. But mark what I say ; you must not be a king as long as your brothers Charles and James live ; therefore, I charge you, do not be made a king by them.
Page 105 - Then, taking my brother Gloucester on his knee, he said, 'Sweetheart, now will they cut off thy father's head/ upon which the child looked very steadfastly upon him. ' Heed, my child, what I say, they will cut off my head, and perhaps make thee a King ; but mark what I say, you must not be a King as long as your brothers, Charles and James, live; therefore, I charge you, do not be made a King by them.

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