Salmonia: Or, Days of Fly Fishing: In a Series of Conversations. With Some Account of the Habits of Fishes Belonging to the Genus Salmo

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 28, 2013 - History - 290 pages
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Championed as one of the gentlest and most calming of field sports, angling has had its notable votaries throughout its history, from Isaak Walton to Horatio Nelson. In this charming book on the pleasures of fly fishing, the eminent chemist Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829) adds his name to the list. He assigns his often poetic arguments to an imaginary cast of four friends, some of whom adore the sport while others question its morality as they embark on a series of angling trips. As their conversations progress, the friends discuss entomology and biology, the finer techniques of landing trout, and the use of peacock feathers and yellow monkey fur in the making of artificial flies. Originally published in 1828, Davy's book offers a glimpse of the sportsman behind the chemist and remains both accessible and instructive for modern enthusiasts.
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
11
Section 3
15
Section 4
36
Section 5
41
Section 6
65
Section 7
67
Section 8
73
Section 9
81
Section 10
175
Section 11
230
Section 12
251
Section 13
277
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