Salt

Front Cover
Random House, Sep 30, 2011 - History - 496 pages
51 Reviews

Homer called it a divine substance. Plato described it as especially dear to the gods. As Mark Kurlansky so brilliantly relates here, salt has shaped civilisation from the beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of mankind. Wars have been fought over salt and, while salt taxes secured empires across Europe and Asia, they have also inspired revolution - Gandhi's salt march in 1930 began the overthrow of British rule in India.

From the rural Sichuan province where the last home-made soya sauce is produced to the Cheshire brine springs that supplied salt around the globe, Mark Kurlansky has produced a kaleidoscope of world history, a multi-layered masterpiece that blends political, commercial, scientific, religious and culinary records into a rich and memorable tale.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Dreesie - LibraryThing

Food and history--one of my favorite kinds of nonfiction book. And who knew salt could be so interesting? I ended up enjoying this more than I expected, and I learned a ton about historic salt ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stef7sa - LibraryThing

Interesting read, full of surprising facts, sometimes a bit dull, when discussing each and every country involved in producing salt. Sometimes you wonder whether the salt industry really was a major concern in all world events, but then again the author is convincing. Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Mark Kurlansky is the author of 23 books of fiction, nonfiction, children's writing. His best-selling Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World won the 1999 James Beard Award for Food Writing and the 1999 Glenfiddich Award. His other works include: Salt, The Basque History of the World and the short story collection The White Man in the Tree. He lives in New York City with his wife and daughter.

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