Same-sex Marriage, Pro and Con: A Reader

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Andrew Sullivan
Vintage Books, 1997 - Social Science - 373 pages
From Plato to Camille Paglia, a collection of opinions, pro and con, on one of the most explosive issues of our time. Were homosexual unions sanctioned by societies before our own? What are the bases for the religious proscriptions against them? Does the Constitution implicitly grant homosexuals the right to marry? Will same-sex marriages make gays and lesbians more like heterosexuals or somehow undermine the traditional family? How will they affect our notions of parenthood?

In Same-Sex Marriage: Pro and Con these questions are explored by clergy and jurists, historians and anthropologists, poets, conservative politicians, queer theorists, and many others. Andrew Sullivan gathers two thousand years of argument on same-sex partnerships into an anthology of historic inclusiveness and evenhandedness. Readers of every sexual and ideological persuasion will be consulting this definitive book for years to come. Includes writings from or by: Genesis, Montaigne, Ann Landers, Antonin Scalia, Plato, National Conference of Catholic Bishops, Katha Pollitt, James Q. Wilson, Hannah Arendt, William Bennett, Senate Debate on Defense of Marriage Act, Jonathan Rauch, Rabbi Yoel H. Kahn, Amy E. Schwartz, William Safire, Barney Frank, and Charles Krauthammer.

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Late last year, the Hawaiian circuit court ruled that the state had no compelling justification for denying gay and lesbian couples the right to wed. The decision opened up what may be the social ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Andrew Sullivan was born in southern England on August 10, 1963. He attended Magdalen College, Oxford, where he took a first in modern history and modern languages. In 1984, he won a Harkness Fellowship to Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He interned at the Centre for Policy Studies, where he wrote a policy paper on the environment entitled Greening the Tories. He received a master's degree in public administration and a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. His doctoral thesis, Intimations Pursued: The Voice of Practice in the Conversation of Michael Oakeshott, won the government department prize. He was a senior editor of The New Republic, a contributor to the New York Times Magazine, and a columnist for The Sunday Times (London). He is the author of several books including Virtually Normal: An Argument About Homosexuality, Same-Sex Marriage: Pro and Con, and Love Undetectable: Notes on Friendship, Sex and Survival. He is one of the world's most widely read bloggers.

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