Sampling Inner Experience in Disturbed Affect

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 30, 1993 - Psychology - 250 pages
0 Reviews
Following up on his groundbreaking 1990 work Sampling Normal and Schizophrenic Inner Experience, Dr. Hurlburt delineates the development of his descriptive sampling method across numerous case studies of depressed, anxious, bulimic, and borderline personalities. Though controversial, the method effectively demonstrates that an `introspective' technique can provide compelling, vivid descriptions of patients, as well as make distinctions between diagnostic groups.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction and Method
1
Examples of Our Results
4
Unsymbolized Thinking
5
The Possibility of Leading the Witness
7
Should We Dismiss This Study Because It Is Introspective?
8
The Method
9
A Comment to Suspend the Introspection Controversy Introspecting Subjects Did Agree About Imageless Thought
15
Unsymbolized Thinking Is the Same Phenomenon as Imageless Thought
16
Multiple Experienced Feelings
128
Multiple Sensed Feelings
131
Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
132
Images
134
Discussion
138
A Bulimic Junior High School Teacher
139
Multiple Experienced Unsymbolized Thinking
140
Multiple Sensed Unsymbolized Thinking
142

Imageless Thought Is Seen as Causing the Demise of Introspection
18
Introspecting Subjects Did in Fact Agree About Imageless Thought
20
The Imageless Thought Prenomenon Supports Our Present Work
25
From Hypomania to Depression
27
A Slightly Hypomanic Student
29
The Slightly Hypomanic Period
30
Inner Speech
35
Emotional Processes Outside of Awareness
36
The Fatigue Period
37
Abrupt Edges of Fatigue Period Images
38
Indeterminacy of Visual Detail in Fatigue Period Images
39
Perhaps No Symbolized Inner Experience in a Fatigue Period Sample
40
Discussion
41
Normal Affect
43
A Medical Student With a Period of Dysphoria1
45
The Normal Affect Period
46
Feelings
50
Just Doing
52
The Dysphoric Period
53
Feelings
66
Images and Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
67
Discussion
68
A Graduate Student with Periods of Depression
73
The Mildly DepressedUpset Period
75
Feelings
77
Emotional Processes Outside of Awareness
78
Inner Speech
80
Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
81
Sensory Awareness
84
The Brighter Affect Period
85
Words Present
86
Complexity of Inner Experience
87
The More Depressed Period
88
Inner Speech
89
Samples during Suicidal Ideation
90
Discussion
91
A Depressed Resident of a Halfway House
93
Unsymbolized Thinking
94
Inner Speech
95
Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
97
Feelings
98
Complexity of Inner Experience
99
The Long Duration of Individual Experience
100
Discussion
101
Inner Experience from Hypomania to Depression
103
Unsymbolized Thinking
104
Inner Perceptual Clarity and Affect
105
Discriminating Perception from Conception in Depression
106
The Unconstancy of the Perceiver in Depression
107
These Observations Apply Both between and within subjects
108
The PerceptualCognitive Changes Are Not Apparent to the Individual
109
Cause and Effect in Our Results
110
Comparing Our Observations to Those of Beck
111
BULIMIA
121
A Bulimic OperatingRoom Nurse
123
Multiplicity in Experience
124
Experienced vs Sensed Awareness
125
Multiple Experienced Unsymbolized Thoughts
126
Multiple Sense Unsymbolized Thoughts
127
Experience Feelings
143
Somatically Oriented Feelings
144
Contradictory Feelings
145
ThoughtFeelings
146
Sensed Feelings
147
Bodily Awareness
148
Congruent Bodily Awareness
149
Inner Visual Experience
150
Discussion
151
Inner Experience in Bulimia
153
Multiple Inner Experience
154
Sensed Awareness
155
ThoughtFeelings
156
Incongruent Bodily Awareness
157
Unsymbolized Thinking
158
Feelings
159
Thoughts Relating to Bulimia
160
Discussion
161
Anxiety
165
A Biology Student with Panic Attacks
167
Feelings
168
ThoughtFeelings
169
Inner Visual Experience
171
Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
172
The Doing of Understanding
173
The Happening of Speaking
175
Discussion
177
A Graduate Student with Test Anxiety
179
Worded Thinking
180
Unsymbolized Thinking
182
Feeling
183
Indeterminate Inner Visual Experience
184
Rumination
185
The Doing of Understanding and of Happening of Speaking
186
Critical of SelfOther
187
Inner Experience in Anxiety
189
Worded Thinking
190
The Doing of Understanding and the Happening of Speaking
191
Unsymbolized Thinking
192
Rumination
193
Critical of SelfOthers
194
Discussion
195
Borderline Personality
197
A Bank Teller with No Figure I Ground Phenomena in Perception
199
The Distressed Period
200
Multiple Images
201
Lack of Figure and Ground in Real and Imaginal Perception
206
Inner Speech
209
Unsymbolized Thinking
210
Feelings
212
The Suicide Image and the End of the Distressed Period
213
The PeacefulAnxious Period
214
Discussion
216
POSTSCRIPT
219
Discussion
221
References
241
Index
245
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

Russell T. Hurlburt pioneered the investigation of inner experience (thoughts, feelings and so on), inventing (in 1973) the beepers that launched 'thought sampling', the attempt to measure characteristics of inner experience. Despite the sophistication of his thought-sampling measurements, Hurlburt concluded, by about 1980, that science needs a better understanding of inner phenomena themselves. Therefore he developed Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES), the attempt to apprehend inner experience in high fidelity. That has led to four books: Sampling Normal and Schizophrenic Inner Experience (1990), Sampling Inner Experience in Disturbed Affect (1993), Exploring Inner Experience (with Chris Heavey, 2006) and Describing Inner Experience: Proponent Meets Skeptic (with Eric Schwitzgebel, 2007). A special issue of the Journal of Consciousness Studies (January 2010) was devoted to DES. Hurlburt is Professor of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and is also the author of a highly regarded statistics textbook, Comprehending Behavioral Statistics (fourth edition, 2006).

Bibliographic information