Sanctifying Misandry: Goddess Ideology and the Fall of Man

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 2010 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 407 pages
"In Sanctifying Misandry, Katherine Young and Paul Nathanson challenge an influential version of modern goddess religion, one that undermines sexual equality and promotes hatred in the form of misandry - the sexist counterpart of misogyny." "To set the stage, the authors discuss two massively popular books - Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code and Riane Eisler's The Chalice and the Blade - both of which rely on a feminist conspiracy theory of history. They then show how some goddess feminists and their academic supporters have turned what Christians know as the Fall of Man into the fall of men. On this interpretation, presented in three "documentary" films, our ancestors once lived in an egalitarian paradise under the aegis of a benevolent great goddess. But men either rebelled or invaded, replacing the goddess with gods and establishing patriarchies that have oppressed women ever since. In the end, however, women will restore the goddess and therefore paradise as well. The authors critique this belief and compellingly show how it has encouraged the widespread misandry in popular culture. They conclude with several case studies of modern goddess religion and its effects on mainstream religion." "Young and Nathanson show that understanding contemporary culture will allow us to move beyond not only gynocentrism and androcentrism but also misandry and misogyny."--Résumé de l'éditeur.
 

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While making some interesting points, this book verges on a concentrated misogyny rather than a "scholarly" work. Arguments against feminist theories are weak, unfounded, with little citations. The authors state their personal opinions and hurt feelings rather than provide ground for a fair, historical debate. The whole notion of "misandry" in popular culture is based on anecdotal and cherry-picked evidence that embodies precisely what the authors themselves criticise among all feminists they seem to hate rather fervently, and between the lines accuse of some kind of neo-political subterfuge. By challenging patriarchy through establishing penis-lacking spiritual and mythical figures, these women are nothing but belligerent renegades greedy for political power and the genocide of men. To summarize, this book is a sheer piece of crap. 

Contents

Pop Goes the Goddess
3
FROM GODDESSES TO WITCHES AND BACK REWRITING THE BIBLE
17
FROM REFORM TO REVOLUTION RESTORING THE GODDESS
147
Beyond the Fall of Man
257
APPENDIX
269
Notes
273
Index
377
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About the author (2010)

Katherine K. Young is James McGill Professor of religious studies at McGill University. Paul Nathanson is a researcher in religious studies at McGill University. They are co-authors of Spreading Misandry: The Teaching of Contempt for Men in Popular Culture and Legalizing Misandry: From Public Shame to Systemic Discrimination Against Men and are currently working on the concluding volume of the series -- Transcending Misandry: From Feminist Ideology to Intersexual Dialogue.

Paul Nathanson is a researcher, religious studies, McGill University, and author of Over the Rainbow: The Wizard of Oz as a Secular Myth of America.

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