Sand-lime Brick

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University of Illinois, 1910 - Bricks - 83 pages
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Page 46 - Effect of day in, sand-lime brick mixtures upon the quality of the resulting bricks. (By SV Peppel) Data: Steam pressure — 150 pounds per square inch. Temperature in hardening cylinder — 185 C. Time exposed to steam — 10 hours. Molding pressure — 10,000 pounds per square inch. The effect of...
Page 76 - Compression tests shall be made on half bricks resulting from the transverse tests. The bricks shall be bedded flatwise on blotting paper, heavy fibrous building paper, or felt, to secure a uniform bearing in the testing machine. * * * The machine used for compression tests shall be equipped with spherical bearing blocks. The breaking load shall be divided by the area in compression, and the Jesuits reported in pounds per square inch.
Page 75 - Transverse Test. At least five brick shall be tested, laid flatwise with a span of 7 inches, and with the load applied at midspan. The knife edges shall be slightly curved in the direction of their length. Steel bearing plates, about J inch thick and 1-| inches wide, may be placed between the knife edges and the brick.
Page 64 - ... is quite probable that all of these reactions take place in the steaming of sand-lime bricks, and perhaps others. The most stable molecules formed are doubtless the simplest ones; consequently, we would expect to find the mass of silicates composed largely of the simple calcium hydro metasilicate. That this is probably the case is shown by the fact that the ratio of combined lime and silica is nearly unity. Varying the ratio of lime to available silica in the raw mixture will have an effect on...
Page 68 - W is the load at which the 2bd2 brick fails, e the distance between supports in inches, and b and d are respectively the breadth and depth of the brick in inches. The compression test is to be made on a half brick laid flatwise and properly bedded in several thicknesses of blotting paper or felt, or, if very irregular, in plaster of Paris. The ultimate load at which the. brick fails divided by the area under compression is taken as the crushing strength in pounds per square inch. For the absorption...
Page 76 - ... inches wide, may be placed between the knife edges and the brick. The use of a wooden base-block, slightly rounded transversely across its top, upon which to rest the lower knife edges, is recommended. The modulus of rupture shall be obtained by the following formula...
Page 75 - Steel bearing plates, about one-half inch thick and 1% inches wide, may be placed between the knife edges and the brick. The use of a wooden base-block, slightly rounded transversely across its top, upon which to rest the lower knife edges, is recommended. The modulus of rupture...
Page 52 - Wright, at the writer's request, examined several specimens of commercial sand-lime brick in the geophysical laboratory of the Carnegie Institution. Mr. Wright states that the binding material of these specimens is a hydrous lime silicate somewhat akin to the familiar minerals of the zeolite group. The reactions involved in the formation of such a hydrous silicate from lime and sand in the presence of steam are simple and well known. It is to be noted, however, that these reactions are in no way...
Page 75 - ... later time in connection with some clay tests. The temperature was measured at this time by the use of Seger cones, Xos. 12 and 8 being the limits to which firing was carried. TESTING. The tests were made according to the latest specifications of the American Society for Testing Materials (Keport of Committee at Atlantic City Meeting, July, 1909; published in Proceedings, Vol.
Page 61 - XO. .12. Silicate Xo. 12 was made with 7.5 per cent CaO and the fine sand prepared from Ottawa Standard sand. The steaming conditions were the same as before, 12-15 atmospheres for 8 hours. Lime-silica ratio =.887/1. Water-silica ratio=.748/1.

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