Sanders' Union Fourth Reader: Embracing a Full Exposition of the Principles of Rhetorical Reading, with Numerous Exercises for Practice, Both in Prose and Poetry, Various in Style, and Carefully Adapted to the Purposes of Teaching in Schools of Every Grade

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Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Company, 1876 - Readers - 408 pages
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Page 26 - Before him went the pestilence, and burning coals went forth at his feet. He stood, and measured the earth: he beheld, and drove asunder the nations; and the everlasting mountains were scattered, the perpetual hills did bow: his ways are everlasting.
Page 32 - Ye pine-groves, with your soft and soul-like sounds ! And they too have a voice, yon piles of snow, And in their perilous fall shall thunder, God!
Page 30 - Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish, I give my hand, and my heart, to this vote.
Page 331 - Where the lamps quiver So far in the river, With many a light From window and casement, From garret to basement, She stood, with amazement, Houseless by night. The bleak wind of March Made her tremble and shiver; But not the dark arch, Or the black flowing river; Mad from life's history, Glad to death's mystery Swift to be hurled— Anywhere, anywhere Out of the world...
Page 377 - Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O UNION, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate...
Page 146 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them " Hiawatha's Chickens." Of all beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid, Talked with them whene'er he...
Page 43 - And heard, with voice as trumpet loud, Bozzaris cheer his band: " Strike till the last armed foe expires; Strike for your altars and your fires; Strike for the green graves of your sires...
Page 39 - Read it on yon bristling steel! Ask it, — ye who will. Fear ye foes who kill for hire? Will ye to your homes retire? Look behind you! — they're afire!
Page 371 - To crimson glory and undying fame, But base, ignoble slaves — slaves to a horde Of petty tyrants, feudal despots, lords Rich in some dozen paltry villages, Strong in some hundred spearmen, only great In that strange spell a name.
Page 144 - Daughter Betsey," said the mint-master, " get into one side of these scales." Miss Betsey — or Mrs. Sewell, as we must now call her — did as she was bid, like a dutiful child, without any question of the why and wherefore. But what her father could mean, unless to make her husband pay for her by the pound (in which case she would have been a dear bargain), she had not the least idea. "And now," said honest John Hull to the servants, "bring that box hither.

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