Sanitary Conditions for Schoolhouses

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1891 - School buildings - 123 pages
 

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Page 166 - Let us imagine that we are entering its gates in the time of its power 100 and glory. A crowd is assembled round a portico. All are gazing with delight at the entablature, for Phidias is putting up the frieze. We turn into another street; a rhapsodist is reciting there ; men, women, children are thronging round him; the...
Page 166 - Achilles, and kissed those hands, — of the terrible, — the murderous, — which had slain so many of his sons. We enter the public place ; there is a ring of youths, all leaning forward, with sparkling eyes, and gestures of expectation. Socrates is pitted against the famous Atheist from Ionia, and has just brought him to a contradiction in terms. But we are interrupted. The herald is crying —
Page 166 - A crowd is assembled round a portico. All are gazing with delight at the entablature, for Phidias is putting up the frieze. We turn into another street; a rhapsodist is reciting there ; men, women, children, are thronging round him : the tears are running down their cheeks ; their eyes are fixed ; their very breath is still; for he is telling how Priam fell at the feet of Achilles, and kissed those hands — the terrible — the murderous — which had slain so many of his sons. We enter the public...
Page 110 - The trustees in the several school districts shall provide suitable and convenient water-closets or privies for each of the schools under their charge, at least two in number, which shall be entirely separated each from the other, and having separate means of access, and the approaches thereto shall be separated by a substantial close fence not less than seven feet in height.
Page 37 - In each class-room the window space should not be less than onefourth of the floor space, and the distance of the desk most remote from the window should not be more than one and one-half times the height of the top of the window from the floor.
Page 110 - September, eighteen hundred and eightyseven, the board of education, or the trustee or trustees having supervision over any school district of this State, shall provide suitable and convenient water-closets or privies for each of the schools under their charge, at least two in number, which shall be entirely separated each from the other and have separate means of access, and the approaches thereto shall be separated by a substantial close fence not less than seven feet in height.
Page 167 - Achilles, and kissed those hands — the terrible — the murderous — which had slain so many of his sons. We enter the public place ; there is a ring of youths, all leaning forward, with sparkling eyes, and gestures of expectation. Socrates is pitted against the famous Atheist, from Ionia, and has just brought him to a contradiction in terms. But we are interrupted. The herald is crying — "Room for the Prytanes." The general assembly is to meet. The people are swarming in one very side. Proclamation...
Page 70 - ... area of its extraction flue. All outlet openings are covered with wire netting of about one inch mesh. Inlets on outside of building are protected" by boxing and fine netting. The illustrations which follow will make this description plain. All dimensions are given in the floor-plan and sections. The capacity of the lower room is 10,700 cubic feet, that of the upper 12,040 cubic feet, allowance being made for chimney, platforms, stoves and jackets, but none for furniture or persons. The air space...
Page 77 - ... Upon the actual amount of glass required by each pupil authorities differ. Dr. Lincoln states that the size of the windows, taken collectively, should equal at least one-sixth of the floor space. Cohn, the German writer, requires one-fifth, or 30 inches to the foot. Some of the highest authorities require from 300 to 350 square inches of glass for each pupil. This coincides very nearly with Cohn, but Dr. Lincoln does not consider that in our schoolrooms that have a greater depth than those referred...
Page 110 - It shall be the duty of the officers aforesaid to keep the same in a clean and wholesome condition, and a failure to comply with the provisions of this act on the part of the trustees shall be sufficient ground for removal from office and for withholding from the district any share of the public moneys of the State.

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