Sanitary Inquiry, Scotland: Reports on the Sanitary Condition of the Labouring Population of Scotland, in Consequence of an Inquiry Directed to be Made by the Poor Law Commissioners

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W. Clowes and Sons, 1842 - Labor - 334 pages
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Page 9 - ... to be warm; and in one bed, although in the middle of the day, several women were imprisoned under a blanket, because as many others, who had on their backs all the articles of dress that belonged to the party, were then out of doors in the streets. This picture is so shocking, that, without ocular proof, one would be disposed to doubt the possibility of the facts ; and yet there is, perhaps, no old town in Europe that does not furnish parallel examples.
Page 73 - The houses in which they live are unfit even for sties; and every apartment is filled with a promiscuous crowd of men, women, and children: all in the most revolting state of filth and squalor. In many of the houses there is scarcely any ventilation; dunghills lie in the vicinity of the dwellings; and from. the extremely defective sewerages, filth of every kind constantly accumulates.
Page 194 - For the poor shall never cease out of the land : therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy land.
Page 43 - It is immaterial how long the practice may have prevailed, for no length of time will legitimate a nuisance.
Page 9 - ... belonged to the party were then out of doors in the streets. This picture is so shocking that, without ocular proof, one would be disposed to doubt the possibility of the facts ; and yet there is perhaps no old town in Europe that does not furnish parallel examples. London, before the great fire of 1666, had few drains and had many suc.h scenes, and the consequence was, a pestilence occurring at intervals of about 12 years, each destroying at an average about a fourth of the inhabitants. " Who...
Page 88 - ... feet. Tranent was formerly well supplied with water of excellent quality by a spring above the village, which flows through a sand-bed. The water flows into Tranent at its head, or highest quarter, and is received into about 10 wells, distributed throughout the village.
Page 8 - September 24th, with Mr. Chadwick, Dr. Alison, Dr. Cowan (since deceased, who had laboured so meritoriously to alleviate the misery of the poor in Glasgow), the police magistrate, and others, we examined these wynds, and, to give an idea of the whole vicinity, I may state as...
Page 9 - Thus, worse off than wild' animals, many of which withdraw to a distance and conceal their ordure, the dwellers in these courts had converted their shame into a kind of money by which their lodging was to be paid.
Page 88 - ... village, which flows through a sand-bed. The water flows into Tranent at its head . . . and is received into about ten wells, distributed throughout the village. The people supply themselves at these wells when they contain water. When the supply is small, the water pours in a very small stream only.
Page 73 - Burnside, there is concentrated everything that is wretched, dissolute, loathsome, and pestilential. These places are filled by a population of many thousands of miserable creatures.

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