Sappho

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University of California Press, 1958 - Greek poetry - 114 pages
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The hundred poems and fragments here translated into modern English constitute all of Sappho that survives, and effectively bring to life the woman whom the Greeks consider to be their greatest lyric poet.

Sappho gives us flashes of vivid comment and description - forthright attacks on her enemies, diologues with her friends, and exasperated exchanges with Aphrodite, the goddess who was both enemy and ally. The poems are highly personal and emotional portrayals of the world she lived in twenty-five hundred years ago.

Mary Barnard's translations are lean, incisive, direct. As a result, she has rendered the beloved poet's verse, long the bane of translators, more authentically than anyone else in English.

 

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Contents

Tell everyone
xvi
We shall enjoy
xvii
PART
xix
Standing by my
i
asked myself 5 And I said
ii
confess
9
At noontime
10
took my lyre and said 9 Although they
11
Its no
13
People do gossip
14
Peace reigned in heaven 15 When I saw Eros
15
You are the herdsman of evening
16
Sleep darling
17
Although clumsy
18
Tomorrow you had better
19
Copyright

That afternoon 11 We heard them chanting
12

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About the author (1958)

Sappho was born in Lesbos.

Barnard studied Greek at Reed College and began to translate at Ezra Pound's instigation in the 1930s.

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