Sarah's Young Man: A Farce in One Act

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C.H. Spencer, 1867 - 21 pages
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Page 4 - Last week Mrs. Fisgig gave a party and ball, and — and I have heard all about it. Ara. About what? Harry. A puppy named Frizzle — I don't know him — wish I did, but I am on his track — was very attentive to you — danced with you twice — yes ; sat beside you at supper — poured nonsense into your ear Ara. How do you know it was nonsense? Harry. How could a fellow with such a name as Frizzle be expected to talk sense ! and he is rich, I am told, and Ara. And passably good-looking — and...
Page 7 - R. 2 E. Oh ! ready at last — I am sure we have no time to lose. MRS. M. (aside.) If I could but speak to Augustus before "we go. (aloud.) I wish it were possible to postpone this visit.
Page 7 - TIBBS, i~ 1 E. Sarah, mind that during our absence you keep all the doors and windows fast. We shall return to-morrow ; and don't for one moment forget that which you thoroughly understood when we hired you. Sarah. No followers allowed ; — I ain't forgot It, sir. Mrs. M. That's right. Sarah. Don't want no young scamps arter me. Don't think I shall ever marry ; but if I should, I'll have a respectable, staid, elderly man. I sees how happy missus is, and I almost envies her. Mog. You talk like a...
Page 8 - Pot," we don't adulterate — much. Occasionally, perhaps, a few horse-beans with the coffee, and Sarah. Ah — and the tea? Sam. Well, with respect to our " three-and-four " — which Is a mixed tea — that certainly is a mixture, and that's all the explanation I can give you ; but, only think, the other day a lady walks into the shop, and asks Tom Jones, who was busy with another customer, for " half a pound of four-shilling black...
Page 4 - I ajso know something — a friend — a London friend, has written me a very full account of your naughty doings — a sheet of paper entirely filled, and crossed and crossed. Oh, goodness, what a bad boy you have been ! Harry. Oh, a friend — ah, a female friend, of course. Ara. Decidedly. Harry. Well, dear Araminta, I will confess that until I knew you, I was rather — rather Ara. (shaking her head) Fast — eh ? Harry. Exactly ! Ara. Now, let me advise you to take care of yourself, for Lucy...
Page 12 - Go, girl, and bury yourself amongst the plates and dishes, and don't dare to show yourself again till I shall send for you. Sarah, (aside) What a temper he is in. Oh, if he should come across my poor Sammy — where can he have hid himself? perhaps he has found his way to the kitchen. Exit L. 1 E. Mog. Lost the train! I knew we should — you two had conspired, for your own ends, to frustrate my intended visit. You didn't, either of you, want to go — you said so, and are of course glad that we...
Page 6 - M. ? — we shall be too late for the train. MRS. M. Oh, no, plenty of time. MOG. Not at all — better be half an hour too soon than half a minute too late ; that was always my maxim when in the counting-house, and I adhere to it now that I am no longer a merchant. MRS. M. Is it important that we should go to-day ? MOG. Certainly ; Fubbs expects us — so get ready ; the train leaves at eleven, the only one that stops at this village. MRS. M. Oh, no, there is another at five in the afternoon. MOG....
Page 7 - Mog. You have ! I am not angry with you — so describe him. What had he got on ? Sarah, Trousers, and Mog. Trousers ! of course ; I am not asking after a wild Indian, or a Highlander; but what was his attire like? Sarah. A — a white hat Mog. White hat ! wears a white hat I that's enough — and If I come across him Enter MRs.
Page 14 - I'll .go for pistols and a second ! Sam, Let me go first, though. Mog. I shall not be long, and, if you are a man, I shall find you here on my return. Exit c. D. to R. Sam. (calling after him) You'll have to make uncommon haste, then And yet, I can't bolt without a fond farewell to Sarah. What a nice mess I am getting into, (calling) Sarah, behold your I think I'd better keep quiet ; she's sure to come presently, and, in the mean time, I'll hide again.
Page 13 - ... of it. (aloud) Sir — (putting hat on his head) I say, sir — (folding his arms and stamping — the hat falls over his eyes) Mog. My hat ! the barefaced thief. Sam. (giving it to him) Take the old guy, and now there's a pair of you. Mog. (laughing savagely) Ha, ha, ha! you shall go to jail. Sam. Well, I sha'n't go without my hat, for it's -a very nice hat — I got it cheap. (going towards room) Mog. Villain, enter that room again, if you dare. Sam. Very well. (walks off into room, L. 2 E.)...

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