Sartor Resartus

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OUP Oxford, Jul 8, 1999 - Fiction - 320 pages
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This edition is the first to present the text as it originally appeared, indicating the changes Carlyle made to later editions. Appendices contain Carlyle's own extensive commentaries on his work. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
 

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User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

Even now that I've read it I'm not entirely sure what prompted me to pick this up at the library book sale this spring. Probably it was the back-cover text noting that the book was inspired in part by ... Read full review

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User Review  - wellred2 - LibraryThing

Sartor Resartvs written and fascimile signed by Thomas Carlyle. The inside pages as shown in the photo have Thomas Carlyle's autograph under a photo and the date that it was signed (1865). The oposite ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1268
NOTE ON THE TEXT
1305
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
1306
A CHRONOLOGY OF CHARLES DICKENS
1311
InscribedTOTHOMAS CARLYLE
CONTENTS
BOOK THE FIRST SOWING
CHAPTER IIMURDERING THE INNOCENTS
CHAPTER IIMR JAMES HARTHOUSE
CHAPTER IIITHE WHELP
CHAPTER IVMEN AND BROTHERS
CHAPTER VMEN AND MASTERS
CHAPTER VIFADING AWAY
CHAPTER VIIGUNPOWDER
CHAPTER VIIIEXPLOSION
CHAPTER IXHEARING THE LAST OF IT

CHAPTER IIIA LOOPHOLE
CHAPTER IVMR BOUNDERBY
CHAPTER VTHE KEYNOTE
CHAPTER VISLEARYS HORSEMANSHIP
CHAPTER VIIMRS SPARSIT
CHAPTER VIIINEVER WONDER
CHAPTER IXSISSYS PROGRESS
CHAPTER XSTEPHEN BLACKPOOL
CHAPTER XINO WAY OUT
CHAPTER XIITHE OLD WOMAN
CHAPTER XIIIRACHAEL
CHAPTER XIVTHE GREAT MANUFACTURER
CHAPTER XVFATHER AND DAUGHTER
CHAPTER XVIHUSBAND AND WIFE
BOOK THE SECOND REAPING
CHAPTER XMRS SPARSITS STAIRCASE
CHAPTER XILOWER AND LOWER
CHAPTER XIIDOWN
BOOK THE THIRD GARNERING
CHAPTER IIVERY RIDICULOUS
CHAPTER IIIVERY DECIDED
CHAPTER IVLOST
CHAPTER VFOUND
CHAPTER VITHE STARLIGHT
CHAPTER VIIWHELPHUNTING
CHAPTER VIIIPHILOSOPHICAL
CHAPTER IXFINAL
APPENDIXDickenss Working Notes for Hard Times
EXPLANATORY NOTES
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Thomas Carlyle was a social critic and historian born in Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, December 4, 1795, the same year as John Keats, but Carlyle is considered an early Victorian rather than a Romantic. After completing his elementary studies, he went to the University of Edinburgh but left in 1814 without a degree. His parents wanted him to become a minister in the Scottish church, but his independence of spirit made such a life program impossible. In 1816 he fell in love with, and was rejected by, a young woman. His love affair was followed by a period of doubt and uncertainty described vividly in Sartor Resartus, a work published in 1833 that attracted much attention. Carlyle's first literary work reveals his admiration for German thought and philosophy, and especially for the two great German poets Schiller and Goethe. The fictional autobiography of a philosopher deeply impressed Ralph Waldo Emerson who brought it back to the United States to be published there. History of the French Revolution (1837), rewritten after parts of it were mistakenly burned as kindling by John Stuart Mill, cemented Carlyle's reputation. The work brought him fame but no great wealth. As a result of his comparative poverty he was induced to give four series of public lectures. Of these the most famous were those On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic of History delivered in 1840 and published in 1841. Past and Present (1843), and Latter Day Pamphlets (1850) present his economic and industrial theories. With The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell (1845), The Life of John Sterling (1851), and History of Frederick II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great (1858-1865) he returned to biography. In 1865, Carlyle was made Lord Rector of Edinburgh.

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