Sartre and Adorno: The Dialectics of Subjectivity

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SUNY Press, Jun 5, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 340 pages
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Focusing on the notion of the subject in Sartre’s and Adorno’s philosophies, David Sherman argues that they offer complementary accounts of the subject that circumvent the excesses of its classical formation, yet are sturdy enough to support a concept of political agency, which is lacking in both poststructuralism and second-generation critical theory. Sherman uses Sartre’s first-person, phenomenological standpoint and Adorno’s third-person, critical theoretical standpoint, each of which implicitly incorporates and then builds toward the other, to represent the necessary poles of any emancipatory social analysis.
 

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Contents

Adornos Relation to the Existential and Phenomenological Traditions
13
Adorno and Kierkegaard
17
Adornos Critique Of Kierkegaard
18
Adornos Kierkegaardian Debt
26
Adorno and Heidegger
37
Adornos Critique Of Heidegger
38
Adorno And Heidegger Are Irreconcilable
46
Adorno and Husserl
59
The Ego In Formation
122
Bad Faith And The Fundamental Project
135
Situated Freedom And Purified Reflection
150
Adornos Dialectic of Subjectivity
173
The DeFormation of the Subject
181
The Dawn Of The Subject
184
Science Morality Art
198
Adorno Sartre Antisemitism And Psychoanalysis
216

Subjectivity in Sartres Existential Phenomenology
69
The Frankfurt Schools Critique of Sartre
75
Marcuses Critique Of Being And Nothingness
78
Sartres Relation to His Predecessors in the Phenomenological and Existential Traditions
87
Knowing
97
Death
106
Sartres Mediating Subjectivity
109
Sartres Decentered Subject And Freedom
110
Subjectivity and Negative Dialectics
237
Freedom Model
248
History Model
262
Negative Dialectics Phenomenology And Subjectivity
273
Notes
283
Bibliography
309
Index
315
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

David Sherman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Montana at Missoula and is the coauthor (with Leo Rauch) of Hegel s Phenomenology of Self-Consciousness: Text and Commentary, also published by SUNY Press.

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