Satisfying Skepticism: Embodied Knowledge in the Early Modern World

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Ashgate, Jan 1, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 239 pages
This volume looks at skepticism, the failure of reflective people to attain what they consider satisfying knowledge. People often notice they don't have reliable access to the godlike knowledge they can nevertheless imagine. However, at the same time, the brain structure that allows skepticism also underwrites an almost infinite potential for responsive growth. This book looks at how skepticism is portrayed in literature and how it is seen as both a state of mind and as a mixture of mind/body construct that can be influenced by its environment.

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Contents

Is Touching Believing? What did Doubting Thomas
28
Shakespeares Coriolanus
45
The Tragic Power of Imagining in Shakespeares Othello
64
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

ELLEN SPOLSKY is a Professor of English at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. She is a literary theorist with an appetite for biological theories such as cognitive cultural theory, iconotropism, performance theory, and even some aspects of evolutionary literary theory. Her books and essays have worked toward a sophisticated understanding of both the universal and historically local aspects of Renaissance art, poetry and drama.

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