Save Me The Waltz

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Harper Collins, May 8, 2012 - Fiction - 262 pages
4 Reviews

Southern belle Alabama Beggs is married to the successful, but philandering, artist David Knight. Desperate for David’s attention and for success in her own right, Alabama devotes herself to building, and ultimately achieving, success as a ballerina. Returning to the South following the death of Alabama’s father, the couple must confront their unhappy marriage and future together.

The only novel by Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, Save Me the Waltz is a semi-autobiographical account of her marriage to acclaimed author F. Scott Fitzgerald. Written while she was being treated for schizophrenia at the Phipps Clinic, Zelda Fitzgerald’s Save Me the Waltz is evocative of high society in the Jazz Age and a woman’s quest to define herself both within and outside of her marriage.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lanaing - LibraryThing

After reading Nancy Milford's (wonderful) biography of Zelda Fitzgerald, I was quick to read Zelda's only novel. Although I already knew Zelda's life story (and this is unofficially an autobiography ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bigorangecat - LibraryThing

Zelda's novel is better than almost all of what her husband wrote. It's colorful, fresh, real and full of life, even today. No wonder Scott cribbed so much of his material from this piece. Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1
II
III
Chapter 2
II
III
Chapter 3
II
Chapter 4
II
III
About the Author
About the Series
Copyright
About the Publisher
Copyright

III

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About the author (2012)

American writer Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald is known as much for her volatile marriage to novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald as she is for her own published work, Save Me the Waltz. Married to Fitzgerald at a young age, Zelda was an icon of the Jazz age, personifying the energy and excess of the Roaring Twenties. As expatriates in Europe, the Fitzgeralds were members of the Lost Generation, socializing with such literary celebrities as Ernest Hemingway and T. S. Eliot. Overshadowed for much of her marriage by her husband’s success, Zelda sought to define her own identity through a variety of artistic endeavours including writing, dance, and art. The strain of her turbulent marriage contributed to her admittance to a sanatorium in 1930, at which time she was diagnosed with schizophrenia. Zelda spent the rest of her life in and out of institutions, and finally died tragically in a fire in 1948.

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